Venice
July 1671

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1939

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82-92

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'Venice: July 1671', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 37: 1671-1672 (1939), pp. 82-92. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90312 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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July 1671

July 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
74. Carlo Contarini, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The serious loss of Panama is accompanied by an acute feeling bitterness on the part of this government, surpassing the usual characteristic of this nation to exalt its gains and to think nothing of losses. These last days the junta of state was held in the presence of the queen herself. In this the count of Pegnoranda, as President of the Council of the Indies, in a querulous voice and with a sorrowful countenance set forth the losses suffered by the crown since he has occupied that position. He laid the greatest stress upon this last misfortune as the greatest of all and one which, if not remedied, involves the greatest damage. He enlarged upon the malignity of his fate and complained that the more zeal and energy he devoted to his operations the more surely they were rendered abortive by events. The last capitulation with the English had aimed at establishing a permanent and secure agreement in America. But instead of keeping faith and observing their compact one saw them broken and violated. He therefore believed that by his resigning that post they would avoid greater misfortunes since the auspices seemed so unfavourable to him and the repeated blows touched him to the quick.
In thus expressing himself so lugubriously he was unable to control his feelings, as he showed by his streaming eyes. There were not wanting those who recalled his excessive readiness to believe that dangers and misfortunes were remote. The constable of Castile spoke very frankly on the subject and, in the matter of the treaty concluded by him last year with the British minister here, accuses him of not including the article that is customary in every treaty, to wit a mutual obligation to make restitution of any conquests made by the parties after the stipulation of the treaty and before its publication.
From these dolorous sentiments and bitter reflections they had to pass with sound prudence to the more manful consideration of how to make good. Here their ignorance of what may have happened after the event led to a great diversity of opinions and advice. It was proposed to make use of the regiment of Sciomberg, owing to the advantage of its being ready, but the queen opposed it strongly as she was unwilling to deprive herself of this body of troops which serves no less as a garrison than as an adornment for the royal persons. They also discussed giving permission to the Biscayans to arm some ships, but against this there militated the same reasons that prevent complaints and reclamations, namely that hostilities would provoke further insults and piracies and so the proposal was dropped. In the end the duke of Medina Celi was directed to take steps for the equipment and embarcation of 3000 men which it would seem they are to take from the garrisons of Andalusia and Estremadura, so that they may have seasoned troops, which would afford them hope of good success.
Madrid, the 1st July, 1671.
[Italian.]
July 1.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
75. By order of the Savii that the Proveditori all'Armar reply to the attached instance of the English resident, about the hiring of the ship Vivian, what is owed and if it fulfilled the obligation to render accounts, sending the whole at once in writing to the Collegio. The essecutori of the deliberations of the Senate shall do the same, stating whether anything has been paid on account of his credit.
Gio. Giacomo Corniani, secretary.
The Memorial.
I am come to ask money owed for about 20 years to certain merchants of the English Company trading at Zante. The paper shows that in the year 1652 your Serenity was indebted to William Tidiman, captain of the ship Vivian for service in the fleet with his ship, in the sum of 4322 crowns at 10 lire each. At that time the Captain General at Sea directed that the captain should have credit for that amount in the chamber of Zante, so I hope that your Serenity, after so many years, will see fit to pay him now in that chamber. He has sent his agent here, at present consul at Zante, (fn. 1) to receive this money. The company of English merchants pays each year in duties to your Serenity in that island at least 150,000 ducats, so I think it will not seem hard to pay this sum out of those duties. I ask your Serenity to facilitate this, not only as being most just, but as being in your own interests and most grateful to me.
Filza.From the Journal of Gerolamo Bondumier, paymaster in the Fleet, 1652, the 1st September, Chieffalo.
For payments to the fleet, the chamber of Zante, 43220 lire for the rest of the service of the ship Vivian, Capt. William Tidiman, until the day when it was dismissed, so that a letter of exchange may be made by the Procurator and Captain General at Sea, Foscolo, to be paid from the said chamber on account of a deposit of currants in the cargo he is destined to take from the islands of Zante and Cephalonia, as agreed.
[Italian.]
July 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian.
Archives.
76. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The king and the whole Court continue to reside at Windsor, amusing themselves with field sports in a climate which is perfection, nor can they yet tear themselves away to go on the intended progress through the kingdom. During the present week all the foreign ministers were at the castle on business and to pay their compliments, and constantly laid siege to his Majesty's advisers to acquaint themselves with the course of current events.
A gentleman in the confidence of the French ambassador, who displayed his talents so far back as the time of Cardinal Mazarin and who has lived a long while in Holland, unbosomed himself to me freely a few days ago. He said that it was only now that circumstances had begun to improve for the king of France, who was enabled to foment jealousy among the allies. The Dutch were now confounded and had brought themselves again to join his Majesty. The ambassador was charged to court the English ministry. For the rest, the peace would not be broken. In the mean time the fortifications would be completed, troops being used for the purpose, and neighbouring powers would be kept at great expense. I wrote as much last winter when I said that Holland and Spain objected to the postponement of the arbitration, for the sake of inducing suspicions of war and prevailing on the English and Sweden to proceed to an open rupture. In this way the United Provinces expected to get out of their troubles and the Catholic to recover what he had lost. To this England would not listen, preferring to recommend quiet. I also wrote that England has never opened her heart to France, but perceiving the change of Holland, through the ascendancy of de Wit, she is beginning to have a better understanding with the Most Christian, though she is still intent on seeking quiet, and there is no suspicion of sudden change.
However the Spanish ambassador continues to believe that mutual arrangements already existed and that they had gone much further. He told me that the ministers here were trying to give him to understand that the policy of Holland would have even worse effects, though he maintains that a timely declaration on the part of England would have checked France, without producing the mischief anticipated. He also complained of a report, not yet confirmed, that the English have made reprisals, first at Panama, then at San Domingo, adding that he should receive the usual answer, that it was against the king's will and that the peace was not infringed, despite these open acts of violence.
The Portuguese Don Francesco de Melo, late ambassador for the prince in Holland, (fn. 2) has received orders to reside here in the like capacity, and is preparing to make a stately appearance, sure of a good reception, especially from the queen, as he was the chief negotiator of her marriage.
I have only seen Lord Arlington for a moment, when he intimated that he had complaints to make. Knowing that these relate to Doddington's bread boat, I will regulate my conversation with him tomorrow by my instructions. I am sure to have a better opportunity of conferring with him here at his apartments in London.
Acknowledges the ducali of the 6th and 12th June.
London, the 3rd July, 1671.
[Italian.]
July 8.
Cinque Savii
alla
Mercanzia
156.
Venetian
Archives.
77. In reply to the petition of Antonio Migrelli and Carlo Rubini for permission to introduce the manufacture of silk stockings after the English fashion into this city, we consider the introduction of new crafts to be praiseworthy, and also that it is in accordance with what has been practised on several occasions, to grant some privilege to those who introduce them. We consider that a plurality of those who make such offers is likely to turn to the public advantage, as in such case it would be reasonable to expect a more speedy extension of the work, a more copious output and greater profit from the introduction.
Dated at the office on the 8th July, 1671.
Hieronimo Corner
Almoro Grimani
Leonardo Pesaro Savii.
[Italian.]
1671.
July 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
78. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
During the present week the king came but once to London, for a few hours, to attend a cabinet council. He is now at Windsor, dividing his time between field sports and business. The government's policy apparently continues the same as on the conclusion of the alliance, for it is evident that the king, importuned first by France and then by Holland to proceed to a rupture, never made any other answer save protestations in favour of quiet. The present altercations of the United Provinces do not in the least shake the firm resolve of the government, which is aware that the readjustment with France cannot have any continuation or substance, nor are they afraid of its lasting. But they do not approve of the States throwing themselves into the arms of the Most Christian and giving him an opportunity to take the third hand in the game and revive the ancient jealousies between the English and Dutch.
The fleet of the United Provinces now at sea numbers 22 ships and frigates besides fireships and scouts. Confidence is so great that there seems no uneasiness and a complete assurance of peace.
A leading minister, who bound me to keep his name secret, unbosomed himself to me thus: Van Beuninghen relied too much on his wits, and de Wit promised himself a great deal from his secret negotiations; but England would never make an agreement except in accordance with her interests, being still impartial and unbiassed, as at first. The French had not much reason to congratulate themselves either, on the helping hand held out to them, merely to prevent Holland from having the game to herself. The United Provinces would deserve a diversion in the direction of the empire, and perhaps the princes there, with the example of Brunswick, would be roused to demand account of the cities, towns and castles which the Provinces have usurped.
The Spanish ambassador when visiting me, said that he considered as granted the levies of troops asked of England by France, and the Governor Monterey, having been greatly alarmed by the vicinity of the Most Christian at Mons, immediately sent a courier to the Provinces for news from Panama, considering the reprisals, which cost the Spaniards upwards of 12 millions sterling, a formal rupture of friendship and peace. The son of [Sir Thomas] Modiford, the governor of Jamaica had been imprisoned here, (fn. 3) and the queen of Spain would not prevent the ringleaders of the attack from being hanged as an example, though she did not intend to urge their execution, as it would make no amends for the loss suffered or for the violation of the peace. Molina expresses himself similarly at the Court, whence I know that orders have been already despatched to send the governor home in irons. It is feared that, knowing of this, Modiford may decide to run desperate risks, and it is the government's intention to make a severe example of him, thereby attending to the public remonstrances, observing the treaty and repressing the proceedings of those corsairs, who, in company with Frenchmen and others, put on board a vessel belonging to the Spaniards, audaciously invaded their territory and sacked it.
Together with the commission appointing Don Francisco de Melo ambassador here, the Portuguese resident Habreu (fn. 4) received his dismissal, and he has already taken leave of the Court and is preparing for his new employment as minister at Rome.
On Saturday last I saw Lord Arlington and found him hesitating to believe advices from Venice that a duty of a real per miara was again being exacted on currants shipped at Zante. He asked me for my opinion, that he might act accordingly. I said I could not imagine such a measure, knowing the positive orders of your Serenity; but it would be safer to await actual remonstrances from the English merchants, who, if wronged, would know how to apply to his Excellency. Arlington was satisfied and then familiarly discussed at length Venetian affairs, the peace with the Turk and the events of the North. But he did not speak of the alliance or say a word about the search made in Doddington's bread boat, so I fancy that the resident has calmed down without further expostulation.
London, the 10th July, 1671.
[Italian.]
July 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
79. To the Secretary Alberti in England.
Acknowledge receipt of his letters of the 19th ult. Enclose a paper of the magistracy of Corn about the behaviour of the Resident Darinton. He is to see the Secretary Arlington and to represent to him the impropriety of Darington's conduct, not only in persisting in smuggling, from which the other foreign ministers abstain, but also of the other matters set forth in the paper, and of his taking banished men into his house and giving them his livery. The Senate feels sure that his Majesty will not tolerate such proceedings. The Senate feels persuaded, from what the Secretary Arlington has said upon other occasions, that when he is made acquainted with the turbulent and restless character of this individual he will see to it that the outcome corresponds with what they desire, so that in the continuation of his service, after excessive correction, the resident may be persuaded to restrain himself within the limits of a suitable moderation.
Ayes, 145. Noes, 2. Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
July 11.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
80. I, Andrea Contarini, went by order to the house of the English resident yesterday to read him your Serenity's office, of which he caused his secretary to take a copy. He said there must be some misunderstanding, as if the captain of the Vivian had been paid he would not have applied to his Majesty's ministers to obtain satisfaction. He thought that the order had been given to the magistracy to pay the captain, and the note that payment had been made must have been simply the instruction. I told him that the papers made by the magistracy in July and February, 1654, were not merely orders to pay, but records of the payment, as he was informed by the Senate's office. He said no more except that he would inform his Majesty; so I took leave and departed.
[Italian.]
July 11.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
81. Some one came to the doors of the Collegio on behalf of the English resident and asked to speak with a secretary. He said the resident was much surprised at the reply given him about the ship Vivian, and asked for the return of his papers on the subject and for a copy of the record of the magistracy of Revisers and Regulators alla Scrittura. On receiving these papers which he opened and glanced through he said: the resident will certainly write to the king and complain of this attempt to involve his ministers in such an affair, so that he may either make clear his claim, if he can, or be punished. With this he left.
[Italian.]
July 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian.
Archives.
82. Francesco Michiel, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
No slight jealousy has been occasioned to the Dutch and the powers of the alliance by the grant made by the king of Great Britain of the levy of 6000 men, two thirds of them English and the rest Scots, in response to the pressing instances of the king here. (fn. 5)
Paris, the 15th July, 1671.
[Italian.]
July 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
83. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
At the beginning of the week as it was said that the king would leave Windsor to inspect Portsmouth and other Channel ports, the foreign ministers immediately hastened to wish him a good journey. But the alarm was a false one, the progress being put off until next week, partly on account of a rheumatic attack which still troubles the queen. But yesterday the king came to London to attend a sitting of the council.
During this state of idleness the Dutch ambassador has had long conversations with me, chiefly about the fleet, which, he says, has been fitted out as a measure of precaution, and is now at sea merely for exercise. This was the fine state of quiet enjoyed by the States through the general peace. He then spoke vehemently on the urgency of affairs in the empire. He did not deny that the United Provinces had sent succour, though tardily, to the town of Brunswick and that they are now very apprehensive about other changes detrimental to their interests.
The Ambassador Colbert also detailed to me in full the arguments repeatedly employed by him to detach this Court from Holland; that she would capture English trade and was so well entrenched by the frontiers of friendly powers and by alliances that the Most Christian could not attack her in any quarter. At length the English ministry began to understand this and would certainly send back the ambassador to Paris. Montagu himself told me that he should hasten his preparations on hearing of the king's arrival there. Colbert added that the arbitration made no progress. When I asked him if the boundaries alone would be adjusted or if fortresses would be exchanged as well for the better definition of the frontier, he replied that these and similar negotiations would not be undertaken during the minority of the king of Spain, as they required more solid foundation.
The Count of Molina is the only ambassador who has remained in London. I do not know if he is preparing to depart for Paris. Hitherto he has said that he was only waiting for the arrival of the Most Christian. I know that he continues to complain openly of what took place in the West Indies, though as the new governor of Jamaica, Sir Linch, has not yet passed Madeira, (fn. 6) the conclusion of the affair will not be known very soon.
Your Excellencies will be surprised to learn that the merchants here regret the fresh advices of other prizes made by Sir [Edward] Spraghe at the expense of the Algerines. Lord Arlington told me that he could not understand them. They all complained that the interests of the country were prejudiced for the sake of glory. He maintained that a war, so costly to the king, proved generally advantageous, as it facilitated navigation for all nations, and a peace restricting the advantage to the English alone would prevent the diffusion of trade, the corsairs being at liberty to harass other flags. He said this was not the most unreasonable part, injuring themselves for the general good, and as the fleet had cost the king an immense sum of money, he might well establish a peace to his own honour. Nevertheless he was sending Sig. Cicli (fn. 7) as commander under Spraghe as before; while promising himself peace it was necessary to parley and to examine the terms.
Sig. du Tel, who has been made a knight of Windsor, (fn. 8) is also hastening his departure for Italy, being appointed to command the two galleys now built for England at Genoa and Pisa. It is proposed to keep them at Tanger, in the hope that they will prove very serviceable, as reported by Sig. Mocenigo two years ago.
Acknowledges ducali of the 20th June.
London, the 17th July, 1671.
[Italian.]
July 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
84. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The king left Windsor yesterday, with a train of courtiers, to inspect Portsmouth alone and then return to London. The queen, whose rheum is better, has withdrawn to Hampton Court. Their Majesties are impatiently awaited in London, which suffers greatly from their absence and petitions them to return.
Fresh advices arrive daily from Panama and the Count of Molina says that he expects worse, as they hear that the English have not yet sailed back to Jamaica and that they commit every possible excess against Spanish honour and property and may be supposed capable of the utmost inhumanity. Spain could no longer expect the observance of the peace from the king of Great Britain, but from the corsairs of Jamaica. Then, without constraint he indulged in many flowers of speech to express his just resentment. The government here treats the matter as a whole (in grosso) leaving it in the state described.
When I met Molina two days ago he told me that he had not yet fixed his departure and was momentarily expecting the courier who would put the embassy to France in motion. In the mean time he did not frequent the Court because, as he often came with complaints, the ministers were always expecting fresh ones. The levies had been granted to the Most Christian. The Irish earl of Roskaman had returned with excellent conditions from his Majesty, and the men would be enlisted in all three kingdoms, and I really believe that all has been arranged already.
In conclusion I found the ambassador extremely jealous of Colbert's advances at this Court. He remarked to me, that the Spanish Court now lived from day to day, after having first sacrificed territory for peace, and then money for the union of the powers and security. At the present moment the union was confirmed without any appearance of security, either through force of arms or friends. Holland thought solely of her own interests (from which I gather that the negotiations of Beverningh at Madrid, which were so much remarked in London, have failed), and England had no other guide than self advantage He also said that the ministers here had sold themselves; but I do not believe it; and your Excellencies must know that England is averse from war as she does not believe in the stability of the allies, and what is worse, the king has neither money to wage it nor confidence to ask parliament for supply. On the other hand, if Spain should suffer and Holland receive some heavier blow, it will not be much regretted here, as the one rivals England in force and the other disputes trade with her.
There is no special news about the arbitration, to which I will attend as directed, and carry out the instructions upon the examinations made in the course of the Fustignoni lawsuit.
London, the 24th July, 1671.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
85. Carlo Contarini, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The serious reflections to which the loss of Panama gave rise were accompanied by the resolution and promptitude of the government in deciding to apply a suitable remedy; but the dispositions necessary for this are not taken with corresponding celerity. Only three ships are ready for troops. Six galleys have gone to Santa Maria with a good cargo of gunpowder. The prince of Montesarchio has not yet arrived at Cadiz. In the mean time many rumours are circulating among the common people about fresh successes of the English in the Indies with others, in exactly the opposite sense, of the recovery of Panama by the Viceroy of Peru, but these are only popular reports.
Madrid, the 29th July, 1671.
[Italian.]
July 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
86. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Scarcely had the king arrived at Portsmouth and inspected among other ships the Great James, newly built to carry 120 brass guns, (fn. 9) than he proceeded to the isle of Wight. From thence, invited by the fine weather, he went with five men of war and eight pleasure boats to Plymouth. The last advices received here announce that he and the duke of York had decided to return to London by sea. They are expected this evening or to morrow, the wind and weather being favourable. As the queen also is coming to town, the citizens hope they will not leave London for the present, though others are of opinion that the king will go to Adelind for his pleasure, and being near at hand, he can conveniently occupy himself there with public business.
There is no home news, and foreign affairs continue as usual; but an experienced person tells me that they are improving for England; that Holland is resuming her former policy and retracts the advances made to France, being disappointed in her expectations of compelling England to commit herself, owing to the sudden withdrawal of the United Provinces; that the English government, conscious of its own interests, had rather raised its arm, suspending the embassy of Temple, sending back Montagu and granting levies to the Most Christian; that the ministers here would never allow the Provinces to anticipate them in their confidential demonstrations towards France; that this firmness, which would be continued, depressed the United Provinces; that it was no longer the time when England unconscious of her strength, did not take advantage of the influence which she possesses over the political events of Europe.
This nobleman maintains that the Most Christian will not risk any undertaking without the assistance or at least the neutrality of his Britannic Majesty, and that Spain and Holland, being unsafe otherwise, must cultivate him to the utmost.
The Ambassador Montagu has taken leave and is only waiting for a yacht to take him across, as his secretary told me two days ago. Permission has been given to raise troops in Ireland and Scotland under the name of recruits, the total exceeding 4000 men, the Most Christian paying three doubloons per head on their arrival in France. Contrary to the belief of the Ambassador Molina, no men will be recruited in England, but on the other hand he complains that nothing is said about the arbitration, and he declares that he cannot understand the Swedish resident here, who is always promising the arrival of the Ambassador Spaar, which never takes place. I cannot ascertain how far the English government urges the resident about this mission, but I fancy that the uncertainty of the negotiation is the cause of the delay. The truth is the king has now appointed Coventry his ambassador in Sweden, though it is not known when he will depart. The object is to keep the Swede firm to that union and policy which gave so much strength to the alliance.
In the mean time Molina does not depart. As he told me that at Antwerp a merchant seized the baggage of the French Ambassador Pomponne for debt adding that he did not know what satisfaction the Most Christian would receive from the United Provinces and then proceeded to talk about what happened between Gremonville and Locovitz at Vienna, (fn. 10) I am at a loss to understand whether the delay of his journey is connected with this last pledge. But I feel sure that he will avail himself of any pretext to await fresh instructions from Madrid, because of his private dissatisfaction.
During the king's absence the French ambassador, having put his retinue into mourning, had public audience of the queen, to impart the death of the duke of Anjou. (fn. 11) As her Majesty has resumed the deepest mourning, all the foreign ministers have followed her example, and similar apparel is being prepared for the king and the whole Court.
This additional expense together with the mourning for the duke of Cambridge and my repeated journeys to Windsor, encourage me to ask for assistance. My hereditary modesty forbids me to make any demand for my household charges, although the regulations made by the king have now increased them to the amount of 100l. per annum, the wine duty, from which foreign ministers used to be exempted, being now exacted from all indifferently. My zeal for the public service makes me bear these charges willingly, but I may remark that the other powers pay the cost of the chapel service of their embassies.
London, the 31st July, 1671.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Sir Clement Harby, at whose request Dodington presented the Memorial. Dodington to Williamson, 4/14 August, 1671. S.P. Venice, Vol. 1, f. 52.
2 i.e. for Don Pedro the Prince Regent of Portugal. Melo went from England to Holland in June 1669. Prestage: Diplomatic Relations of Portugal, page 235.
3 Charles Modyford was committed to the Tower on 16 May, o.s. Cal. S.P. America and W. Indies, 1669–74, p. 218.
4 Gaspar de Abreu de Freitas, who succeeded Ruy Tellez de Menezes in the autumn of 1668. Prestage: Diplomatic Relations of Portugal, p. 170.
5 On 2 July Molina reported to the Queen Regent that M. Amilton (Sir Geo. Hamilton) had gone to Ireland to levy 1500 men. Lord Roscommon had gone to France to arrange a levy of 3000 Irish and Lord Duglas (Lord Geo. Douglas) was in Scotland to levy as many Scots as he could. P.R.O. Spanish Transcripts. Douglas had a warrant, dated 26 May, authorising each of sixteen captains to levy 100 men in Scotland to make up his regiment. Permission for Hamilton's levy was given in an order to the Justices, dated 10 June. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1671, pp. 278, 311. Writing to King Louis on 12 June Colbert says: “Les pressantes instances que fait Milord Roscoman pour le même sujet (a levy). qui sont soutenues par le due do Bouquinam et le due d'Ormont, embarassent le roi qui apprehende l'éclat; mais comme ses intentions sont fort bonnes, on me fait fort esperer qu'on trouvera l'expedient de faire reussir cette affaire à la satisfaction de Votre Majesté.” P.R.O. Paris Transcripts.
6 Sir Thomas Lynch. He sailed from Deal on the 6th April, but did not reach Barbadoes until the beginning of June. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1671, pp. 177, 416.
7 Sir John Chicheley; but he did not sail until October. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1671, p. 544.
8 Sir Jean Baptiste Duteil. He also did not start before October. See Cal. S.P. Dom., 1671, pp. 325, 351, 520. The poor knights of Windsor were instituted on the foundation of the order of the Garter for poor or decayed members of the general body of chivalry. They received originally a pension of 18l. 5s. yearly, which was doubled by James I. Nicholas: Orders of Knighthood, Vol. ii, pp. 471–83.
9 It should be the Royal James, launched on 31 March, o.s. Cal S.P. Dom., 1671. p. 162.
10 The Marquis of Gremonville, French ambassador of Vienna, was affronted at a public comedy by Prince Lobkowitz, chief steward of the empress. It was believed that this had been done at the instance of the Spanish ambassador, and Louis demanded satisfaction, but on further consideration he considered it was only a private wrangle. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1671, pp. 408–9.
11 Philip, second son of Louis XIV. He died at St. Germain on 10 July. W Perwith on 11 July. S.P. France, Vol. cxxxi.