Venice
May 1672

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1939

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204-216

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'Venice: May 1672', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 37: 1671-1672 (1939), pp. 204-216. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90322 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


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May 1672

May 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
203. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The presence of the duke of York was not needed with the fleet either for its equipment or to guarantee it from insult from the Dutch, the ships being all ready to set sail and safe within the new fortress of Sheerness, against any attempts which might have been anticipated, by reason of the persistent contrary winds during the last ten days, which might have carried the Dutch into the Thames. But no fears are entertained; indeed on Monday morning the king in person, accompanied by all the chief personages of the Court, betook himself to the fleet and he is still there. It is reported to be ready to put to sea when the wind changes, and as that has improved since last evening, all the volunteers are hastening to the place of embarcation, in the hope that so soon as there is an opening the fleet will take station in the Downs, from whence it may sail with any wind.
The king has sent twenty pilots to France on board a man of war that they may serve on board the French fleet when it reaches the English coast, which is of such difficult navigation. (fn. 1) It was not thought necessary to send a squadron to meet them in the Channel; so the junction of the two fleets will take place shortly, either in the Downs or at sea.
To prevent any confusion the king is having instructions printed in English and French for the guidance of the naval commanders. The combined fleet is to be divided into three squadrons of thirty ships each. The colours of the two English ones are red and blue; those of the French, who will be placed in the centre, white. I will forward these and other orders, when they are published.
The queen, having allowed this opportunity to pass, will not now go down the river to the fleet, although all the foreign ministers propose to pay their respects to the duke of York. The French ambassador is already with him; the Spaniard does not yet stir and the Dutchman is sequestrated in London, waiting for a passport from the king for his safe passage to Holland.
The duke of Richmond has at last started on his embassy to Denmark, to act as sponsor for the Danish king's eldest son, having two men of war at his service. (fn. 2) As the treaty with this crown has been printed, I will forward a copy.
The Ambassador Montagu is expected from France, the earl of Sonderland, now in Spain, being appointed to succeed him. I may add that in reward for their zealous services on a variety of trying occasions the king has created the earl of Lauderdale, chief secretary of Scotland, a duke in that country; has made Arlington earl of Arlington and Viscount Setford; Lord Ashley, earl of Shaftesbury and baron Cooper of Paulett, and Sir [Thomas] Clifford baron Clifford of Chudleigh. (fn. 3) All these promotions, besides being agreeable to the persons so distinguished, are approved by the Court and encourage everybody to serve his Majesty.
London, the 6th May, 1672.
[Italian.]
May 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
204. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Last week I gave the king's motives for making war. He expects by this policy to atone for his own omissions and for the unfaithfulness of Chancellor Clarendon, who brought the country to the verge of civil war. So his Majesty now seeks to subdue his subjects, to assume authority and to take advantage of the ruin of his dangerous neighbour.
If fortune favours his hostilities in the present campaign, he will not have advanced too far, disposing absolutely, as he does, of the purse and of the consciences of his subjects. But in the event of a reverse it will behove him to address the parliament in another tone, to obtain money, as by the forces remaining on foot and with the support of the party which he is forming at home by the bestowal of benefits, he may hope to maintain himself, all the same, in his present authoritative position.
To carry so important a point the king has entrusted the fleet to the courage of the duke, who will do his utmost, and the union with France will be sincere and faithful, devoid of jealousies, to thwart the undertakings; though as the object of England is to humble Holland, not to destroy her, and to keep English interests in mind, the Senate may calculate the duration and constancy of the alliance.
Your Excellencies will have heard of the declaration of Sweden, who is satisfied with the pension of
600,000 rix dollars, paid hitherto by the Most Christian, together with an additional 200,000, should this suffice to keep the princes of the empire neutral. The belligerents will be reduced to a small number, and although the French force against Holland preponderates, yet Spain is in no condition to oppose it, and on this occasion must of necessity allow the balance to lean; whereas if other powers do not intervene, England will be in a position more easily to provide for her interests, at the moment.
According to instruction I repeat No.
72 to the effect that Spain would not really pledge herself to Holland. This is the case, as she declines the offensive alliance and the succour reduces itself to an inconsiderable number of troops. She now seems disposed not to dispute the passage of the French. The Spaniards say that by the terms of the league they are merely bound to refuse it, if demanded by the Most Christian, but not to offer resistance if he takes it by force of arms. If so Holland will find herself alone in the dance, Spain leaving her there from impotence or design, for it is possible that by a report of the alliance she aimed at lulling Holland and diverting her from submission to the Most Christian, in order subsequently to saddle her with the entire weight of the French forces, which might otherwise have pounced on the Spanish possessions. All this agrees with what was said to me by Arlington a fortnight ago, to wit that Monterey was never in the secret and Van Beuninghen, sent by the States to Brussels, will have his usual bad luck, proving himself indifferently persuasive, for he is the one who, two years ago, exerted himself in vain to make his Britannic Majesty wage war on the Most Christian.
London, the 6th May, 1672.
[Italian; deciphered.]
May 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
205. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The king, weary of remaining any longer with the fleet, and called to London by press of business, came back yesterday at noon, leaving fifty large men of war at the North Foreland. Ten others are ready to follow them that they may all assemble in the Downs. His Majesty's passion for naval manoeuvres have rendered him so thorough a master of the science that on several occasions he outdid the pilots, who had gained their skill by experience. He finds satisfaction at seeing four large ships, built under his own orders and of a new construction, carrying larger sails, standing a heavier sea and making more way than the others.
The duke remains with the fleet in momentary expectation of that of France, which the king means to visit. To that end yachts and coaches are ready to convey him to the nearest point. I am following the example of the other foreign ministers and shall leave tomorrow for the fleet to compliment the duke of York in the name of your Serenity, for his Highness always treats me with gracious distinction.
Last evening, when Lord Arlington returned from the fleet, Fresno made him a grave speech. Its first words, which I heard, were: It seems to me, my lord, that we shall have war. The rest was communicated to me. It is that Sunderland having presented a haughty note to the Spanish cabinet, the Spaniards resented it and desired Fresno to make strong representations on the loss England would incur by the interruption of trade, the Catholic kings having tolerated the great advantages derived thence by the English, on account of the great value attached by Spain to his Majesty's friendship. But as that failed her on the present occasion, the queen mother would take counsel accordingly and leave the king to devise means for quieting the discontent of his subjects, whom the loss of the Spanish trade would drive to rebellion.
To this threat, which I know irritated the king, Arlington replied in general terms. The reason the Spaniards were induced to use such language is that at Madrid Sonderland threatened war if the queen should oppose the hostilities against Holland by drawing off the French forces or refusing them a passage. From this I gather that the English aim at frightening the Spaniards, who fancy they can bridle them by interest, it being desirable to dissipate this fraud quietly. Similarly as the other, which hitherto concealed the real intentions, has been made to vanish, on its being discovered that the Most Christian, very far from waging two wars at one and the same time, threatened Spain solely to intimidate her, while the Catholic king, not being at all disposed to lose himself with Holland, made a fuss about the league with the secondary intention of making the United Provinces bear the brunt of the French hostilities.

I send this lest I should not return in time for the usual post on Friday next.
London, the 9th May, 1672.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Cl. vii,
Cod. mdclxxi,
Bibl. di
S. Marco,
Venice.
206. James, duke of York, etc.
Instructions for putting the king s army in order of battle.
[French.]
May 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
207. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
As it was uncertain whether I should find the duke of York at the North Foreland or in the Downs, I deferred my journey until tomorrow morning, definite news having come to day that his Highness has anchored in sight of Deal with upwards of fifty sail. I enclose a note of the ships, with the commanders, men and guns. I may add that the ships mentioned are not yet all ready, the truth being that the king, intent on preserving trade during the war, dispenses with a quantity of sailors and men whom he might press into his service on board the fleet, and they will suffice for the convoys.
Advices are expected momentarily from Portsmouth of the arrival there of the French. By his Majesty's order four of the chief officers of the Court have sent their establishments there in advance, to keep open house in honour and for the convenience of as many of them as shall assemble there on this occasion.
A number of coaches have already set out to serve as relays, his Majesty intending to perform the journey expeditiously and the queen's curiosity being roused, she has made a fresh arrangement to go and see the fleet in the Downs.
I will not weary your Serenity with a detailed account of all the orders and regulations issued, but it is evident how the experience gathered by them from their late adversities gives them an advantage in the present circumstances, for it is incredible how, without the slightest fuss, their foresight provides for everything.
The first attempts of the Dutch, who made a foray from Hulst in the direction of Odenarde, and the other encounters near Cologne, will be known to your Serenity; and you will have heard that the Most Christian on arriving at Charleroi, sent a gentleman to Brussels to assure the governor of his friendly intentions, intimating that his army, on its passage through certain places belonging to the Catholic, would inconvenience them as little as possible. From the ambiguous replies of the constable that he neither could nor would interfere in the matter, inferring that his Majesty had notified them in Spain, especially as he took the pass without asking for it, your Excellencies will see that Monterey will neither commit himself to anything nor dispute the passage. So the English ministry comforts itself with the belief that after mature reflection either from necessity or advisedly, the Spaniards have renounced those measures which the United Provinces urged, relying on Spanish support.
Monterey has held a long conference at Antwerp with Marshal Wurtz, Riperda and Schad, the Dutch plenipotentiaries, with whom were Van Beuninghen and Vribergen. They all insisted on having back their six infantry regiments, which had been sent into the Spanish Netherlands, as that territory now seems safe from French aggression. As yet they have obtained nothing, indeed when they insisted that Spain should deny passage to the French, Monterey replied that the army was not strong enough for this, and they parted, mutually dissatisfied. All this serves to revive the good understanding between England and Spain.
I rejoice at the approval of my fulfilment of the instructions about the price of currants and Captain Galilee. Lord Arlington, as usual, expressed the king's satisfaction, and then, two evenings ago, he told me his Majesty had just signed a letter recalling the Resident Dodington, (fn. 4) and they would immediately consider replacing him by some other satisfactory person, who would maintain the good relations. He did not tell me the reasons for this and I did not ask, as I knew them already through another channel. I merely said that your Serenity would welcome any minister of his Majesty, and the state was always disposed to maintain the best possible intercourse.
The Court had been so impressed with the proceedings of Mr. Dodington, that on hearing that he had ventured to add certain particulars to the king's letters, tampering with seals and signatures, there was nothing for it but to disgrace him. Remarks were also made about his trial of your Serenity's patience on various previous occasions. The king expressed himself to me in this sense in the course of a familiar conversation, alluding to the restless character of this individual; but I was reserved. If the consul comes here influenced by the resident's passions, I will let your Excellencies know.
London, the 13th May, 1672.
Postscript: a courier from Portsmouth announces the arrival there of the French fleet, and although it is now near midnight the king has decided to start before day break tomorrow, and the queen will go to the Downs tomorrow.
[Italian.]
May 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
208. To the Secretary Alberti in England.
Informing him of what has been done for Captain Galileo and of the permission given to Alvise Morelli, agent of the English merchants, to lade the ship Somissione with oil, without paying the full duty. The Senate hopes that the English consul will make a good report when he arrives at Court.
The Senate has decided to allow him 300 ducats of good value towards his expenses for mourning for the duchess of Orleans.
He is to support a petition in favour of the ship Leonessa, Captain Giovanni di Girardo of Giovanni Vanost, which is now at Amsterdam, bound for Venice with goods belonging to particular merchants of the piazza; as there is uneasiness about it because of the war declared against Holland. (fn. 5)
That 300 ducats of good value be paid to the agents of Girolamo Alberti, secretary in London, for his relief for expenses on mourning for the duchess of Orleans.
Ayes, 108. Noes, 5. Neutral, 2.
In the Collegio on the same day:
Ayes, 17. Noes, 3. Neutral, 1. It requires 4/5ths.
[Italian.]
May 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
209. Ottaviano Valier, Venetian Resident at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
An English gentleman (fn. 12) has arrived at Court with orders to cause the launch of some galleys built in the arsenal of Pisa by order of the Grand Duke for the service of his Britannic Majesty. The gentleman is to be their captain. Having been despatched for this special purpose he has been lodged in the palace and has had audience of the princes with very stately ceremony as the Grand Duke is always very anxious to show his regard for the British House and his confidential relations with it. It is supposed that there is some other and more secret business as he has spent many hours in a secret conference.
Florence, the 14th May, 1672.
[Italian.]
May 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
210. Carlo Contarini, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassadors have in these last days presented a new memorial to the duke of Pegnoranda, who is deputed for them. In this they pretend that this crown in giving succour to the Dutch in the war declared on them by the king, their master, is openly violating the peace it has with him. They contend that in a secret article there it is agreed that the parties shall not give succour to enemies of the other, of any kind soever. The matter was discussed in the Council and the reply has gone forth. In this they refute the contention alleging that by enemies of the English crown must be understood rebel subjects or those who were the first to attack it. (fn. 13) To this interpretation the ambassadors have made a prompt reply, maintaining that the article is general. They go on to say that even if it were not and if the alleged exception were allowed, the Dutch, by refusing to dip their flag to the royal Standard of England were the first aggressors. They declare that such an action ought to be taken as the equivalent of hostilities and an invasion of the very soil of England.
Although they claim here that they are at liberty to succour the Dutch against any power whatsoever, and, so f ar as outward shows go, display the utmost vigour and resolution, in reality they are carefully studying to keep away from any sort of commitment. As a matter of fact if the monarchy were attacked by powerful enemies the quality of the present government, by itself alone, would involve them in serious and fundamental disasters.
It was thought that the earl of Sunderland, ambassador extraordinary of England, had been commanded to assume the character of ordinary and present himself in public form to their Majesties and ministers when he recently set up the royal arms over the door of his house, after he had been staying here for six months. This was generally concluded by common report; but it now appears that what was supposed to be the sign of his permanence is changed to one of his imminent departure.
The Ambassador Godolphin, however, will continue his sojourn at this Court though he does so in a private form without any exterior appearance. He thus reconciles obedience to his master with considerable profit for himself by such a posture when commands reach him. He wishes to remain here and avoid any sort of appearance. The ambassador had caused the manifesto of war against Holland to be printed. After it had been sold openly about the streets for one day they have caused it to be suppressed after a due consideration of the matter, much to the annoyance of the minister. Strict orders have been given that no more copies shall be issued.
Madrid, the 18th of May, 1672.
[Italian.]
May 19.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
211. The Resident of his Britannic Majesty came into the Collegio and presented the memorial below, which was read. He said afterwards that he had delayed coming because he felt sure that the Clisenti would have apologised to him, when he Would have had pity on them; but as they had neglected this duty he had to bring the matter forward especially as the cause was most unreasonable. In the absence of the doge the senior councillor Sig. Sebastian Bernardo replied that they would take his requests into consideration and see that justice was done in accordance with his wishes. After this, and the usual reverences, he departed.
The Memorial. (fn. 6)
An attempt by Francesco Clisenti, a livery servant of Count Camillo di Lucarno, against one Druso Guerra, a friend of mine, brings me to your Serenity to ask for redress for the affront to my house. On Sunday the 15th about the 22nd hour this Francesco, with a naked knife in his hand, came to the door, pretending that he wished to speak with Druso and treacherously attacked him, pretending that he had a message from his master. Fortunately Druso became aware of his intention in time and escaped the danger to his life, the fellow being disarmed by my servants who happened to be near. My respect for the laws of the republic causes me to leave the defence of my house entirely to the justice of your Serenity, to whom I appeal in the confidence that you will punish the disrespect shown and prevent any mischief that may arise from a man of such fierce and barbarous character.
[Italian.]
May 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
212. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The king left for Portsmouth on Saturday morning on the news of the arrival of the French, the queen going to Deal to compliment the duke of York before he left the Downs. But the duke, having received secret information that the Dutch, with a fleet of eighty sail intended to prevent the junction of the English and French, put to sea on Friday night and with a fair wind found himself off the isle of Wight and facing the French, thus thwarting the Dutch.
The North east wind which carried the duke into the Channel also gave the Dutch a quick passage into the Downs. Perceiving that they had missed their aim by a few hours, they cruised about all day Sunday, and the queen, arriving at Deal and expecting to go on board her brother in law's ship, had a clear view of the enemy. She returned to London on Monday, and Ruyter advanced as far as Dover, anchoring just out of reach of the coast batteries, to the inconvenience and apprehension of the town. Mustering their militia and relying on the shallow harbour, which can only be entered by small vessels and at high water, they were not alarmed at seeing until yesterday morning, almost a hundred enemy sail in front of them.
For five days the Dutch made no at tempt, having merely captured the French ship Victory, of 34 guns and 150 men, taken by the English in the late war with France, which they encountered in shallow water off the coast, between Margate and the North Foreland. (fn. 7) On the other hand a number of yachts got safe into Dover, the Dutch having been unable to take a single one. Many of them were full of sailors and conveyed news letters from all quarters.
The Dutch held councils of war every day, as seen on Ruiter's ship; but although the wind was in his favour he never dared to give battle to the English fleet, either because the Dutch do not think themselves in sufficient force, or because they do not choose to risk an engagement between the English and French coasts, with the enemy in front of them and a fresh breeze astern, without any harbour of refuge. They merely left two ships of their rear guard to the westward, within sight of Dover. It is not known whether they will wait for the English, in the open sea, off Ostend, or retire to Holland. It is remarked that they do their utmost to spare both ships and men. De Wit, having landed some women, who were taken on board the Victory, sent a letter to the governor of Dover, asking for an exchange of prisoners, in vain, and it is supposed that the king will refuse for the sake of embarrassing the Dutch, who are short of soldiers.
The North east wind still continues, and though it is dead ahead, the duke of York avails himself of the tides and draws nearer to this port every day, accompanied by the whole fleet. It is hoped that he will be sighted tomorrow morning, for once he reaches the Downs the Dutch will no longer be able to get to windward of him. On this occasion they have reaped no fruit from their advantage and but little glory, and the English are confident that the world will clearly see how easy it was for Ruiter to show himself on these coasts when York was not there, and how discreditable his retreat is while the duke is beating up against the wind.
I was an eye witness of all this from Dover castle, whither I had gone from Feversham, where I left the yacht on hearing of the events mentioned. Expecting the duke at any moment I propose to pay him my respects and then to return immediately to London, as the king did yesterday, from Portsmouth. The French ambassador did the same. He has secured that henceforth the fortresses of his Britannic Majesty will return the salute of French ships with an equal number of guns, whereas hitherto the English saluted with two discharges less.
Dover, the 20th May, 1672.
[Italian.]
May 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
213. That the following be sent this evening to the Resident of his Britannic Majesty, by a notary of the ducal chancery, to be read to him: (fn. 8)
We have heard with displeasure the improper behaviour of Francesco Clisenti against Druso Guerra. As we desire your house to enjoy a proper respect and that the offence may be severely punished we have referred the same to the Avogadori di Comun, who will proceed without delay to form a process thereupon when they will receive information, and decide as justice requires. We impart this much to you that you may rest satisfied that your instances are always received by us with a strong desire of complying with you so that we may show on all occasions our esteem of the ministry which you so worthily sustain.
Ayes, 88. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
May 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
214. Giovanni Morosini, Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the Doge and Senate.
Colonel Guasconi, the British envoy has lett the Court of Insbruch and two days ago he arrived in the neighbourhood of this city with strong hopes of good success in his negotiations. Before he receives fresh commissions from England touching these same projects of a marriage between the duke of Jorch and the archduchess of Austria he will not render himself visible at this Court.
Guasconi announces that the first blows directed by a secret understanding against the States dependent on the Dutch will fall upon the towns of Utrecht and Nimmeghen which are set deep in the very heart of the States. He enlarges upon the formidable power of the two allied kings and intimates that their original plan, which was abandoned, was to surprise the fortress of Huesden.
Medelin, the 21st May, 1672.
[Italian.]
May 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
215. Francesco Michiel, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Dutch build upon their fleet, but victory is uncertain. Many have believed that they lost by a few hours the chance of interrupting the junction of the two fleets; but the wisest judge that they did not even attempt to do so as they were in dread of being surprised by the ships of England and of losing the anchor of their hopes at a single stroke. The count of Etre, vice admiral of this kingdom, enjoys the glory of having united the fleet of this country with the English one and thereby, with so many vessels available, of having secured advantages for the king here and prejudice to the enemy. The king has taken a particular pleasure in this news, the more so because they have learned by letters of the Ambassador Colbert that the British king has chosen to inspect all the ships and given to the king here an open testimony of sincere friendship and simple faith by going on board and entrusting his royal person to the good faith of the French. (fn. 9) From this act it is believed that a confident and intimate alliance has been established between these two powerful kingdoms not for days but for ages.
Near Viset on the Meuse, the 26th May, 1672.
[Italian.]
May 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
216. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The duke of York could only make his way from Portsmouth to Dover Dy tides and short tacks, against a contrary wind, although a change had been expected. Advices arrived daily from the fleet, but the most certain were received by the governor of the castle on Monday night. He at once set sail in a yacht and I accompanied him. (fn. 10) We came in sight of the fleet after making two tacks. In two hours I found myself on board the Prince, which carried the flag of the duke as Lord High Admiral of England. He received me with remarkable graciousness and was much gratified by the office I performed on behalf of your Serenity, wishing him success. He knew that I had waited eight days for him at Dover and on this occasion, as ever, he showed me extraordinary kindness. He at once placed one of his own yachts at my disposal and took me all round the fleet, which I saw both at anchor and under sail. It is incomparably finer than the Dutch one. It is of greater tonnage, but not more numerous, as fresh frigates leave Holland every day to join their sixty men of war and twenty fireships.
I saw the French squadron, which, to the duke's great satisfaction sails well, and although several of them are less fully manned than the English, their guns are good. They have the honour to be placed on the duke's right; Montagu is on the left with the blue squadron, the duke's being the red. He hoists the Standard of England by the king's special permission, who grants it to his brother as a mark of the highest esteem.
Mons. d'Estrees merely carries the Vice Admiral's flag at the fore, although he acts as admiral, because in France none but the admiral in person hoists the flag. His ships number thirty and the English certainly sixty. I left them yesterday at 4 p.m. off the South Foreland, beyond the Goodwin Sands, in the act of casting anchor, and returned to Dover in the yacht, after again wishing success and glory to the duke.
Before I left the fleet the duke received word that the Dutch, having spied eight English ships with two fireships in the river, thirty of them gave chase. But the English, answering their fire, retreated to Sirnes where the Dutch did not venture to remain under the guns of the fortress. In the hurry of the retreat one of the English ships (fn. 11) ran aground, the entire Dutch fleet being in the King's Channel at the mouth of the Thames. On hearing this the duke told me he had determined to advance and place himself between it and Holland, so as to get the weather gauge of them, and drive them on the English coast without means of escape.
On arriving in London at noon today, having hastened my journey to save the post, I handed his Majesty a letter from the duke. He told me that Prince Rupert had again sent out the ten men of war against the Dutch and that the stranded vessel got afloat with the flood tide.
This is all I remarked during my stay with the fleet. Every one on board showed the utmost courage, the gentry stimulated by the duke's example and the soldiers from their natural instinct. Almost the whole of Wednesday afternoon a very bright rainbow was visible over the sun, and the king told me it was the natural effect of the wind prevailing.
Acknowledges the ducali of the 23rd and 30th April.
London, the 27th May, 1672.
[Italian.]
May 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
217. To the Secretary Alberti in England.
Acknowledge receipt of his letters. The Senate takes note of the great equity of Lord Arlington in declaring that he would not take it amiss if any instance made by the English resident which lacked a sound foundation of reason were dismissed. He is to confirm Arlington's good will assuring him of the desire of the Signory for perfect correspondence with that crown. This has been proved by a decision taken lately at the request of the resident, as shown by the memorial enclosed. Alberti did well not to press the case against that minister when he found that Arlington was sufficiently disposed to refuse him facile credence and to wish him to be admonished.
Ayes, 110. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
Italian.]

Footnotes

1 On 21 April, o.s., John Pepys wrote to Henry Russel desiring him to provide boats to carry on board the Henrietta yacht the pilots appointed for the French fleet. They were ready that evening and sailed from Portsmouth on the 24th in the Holmes for Brest, where the French fleet was waiting for them. This was reported by Capt. Werden of the Yarmouth, and to that circumstance is probably due the statement that it was the Yarmouth which had gone to Belle Isle with twelve pilots who were to bring the French fleet into the Downs. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1671–2, ff. 360, 370, 374, 385.
2 He sailed from Landguard on 27 April, o.s., in the Portland frigate, Capt. Thomas Guy, with the Speedwell in company. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1671–2, pp. 282, 384.
3 Henry Bennet was created viscount Thetford and earl of Arlington on 20 April, old style. London Gazette, April 18–22, 1672. Clifford was enobled on 22 April and Cooper made earl of Shaftesbury on the 23rd. According to G. E. C. Lauderdale did not receive his dukedom until 26 May. Complete Peerage, new series, Vol. vii, p. 489.
4 According to Williamson's journal Dodington's revocation was signed on 30 April, o.s. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1671–2, p. 610. The letter of recall, presented in the Collegio on Nov. 25, is dated 29 April. See below.
5 In S.P. Venice, Vol. li, f. 250, there is an undated paper endorsed as a memorial of the Italian resident, on behalf of John van Aelst of Flanders for the ship Leonessa, Capt. John de Gerardo. It states that in July 1671 the Council “did favour the cittadinanza of van Aelst, and declared the ship Venetian.”
6 Sir John Baptist Duteil. He reached Florence on the 11th from Leghorn. He presented a letter from the king to the Grand Duke, who made a present of the galley to Charles and told Duteil to give him a memorandum of whatever else he wanted. Duteil to Williamson, 16 May, 1672. S.P. Tuscany, Vol. xiv.
7 The text of this answer, dated 4 May, is in S.P. Spain, Vol. lix., with an English translation, as well as the rejoinder of the English ambassadors. dated 8 May.
8 The full text of the Memorial with an English version ia in S.P. Venice, Vol. li, ff. 182–8.
9 She was escorting ketches full of sailors and soldiers, which escaped. Colbert to the king on 19 May. P.R.O. Paris Transcripts. She was taken between the Knock and the Foreland on 5th May, o.s. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1671–2, page 536.
10 There is a copy of this paper in S.P. Venice, Vol. li, fol. 192, with an English translation. Writing on 24 May, o.s., Dodington says that Druso Guerra “is now really in danger as the temper of this people goes.” Ibid., f. 198.
11 The king visited the French fleet at Portsmouth on 5th May, o.s., staying about three hours on board the St. Philip (flag), the Terrible and Superbe Cal. S.P. Dom., 1671–2, page 469.
12 Col. John Strode, lieutenant-governor of Dover castle. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1671–2, page 574.
13 Apparently the Royal Katharine, Capt. Amos Beare. See Cal. S.P. Dom., 1671–2, pp. 526, 561, 593.


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