Venice
July 1675

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1947

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426-438

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'Venice: July 1675', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 38: 1673-1675 (1947), pp. 426-438. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90387 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


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July 1675

July 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
522. Paolo Sarotti, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I have spent all these days in visits, active and passive. I have been received and seen by divers of the great lords here and by the principal ministers of the king with great kindness. I am bound to testify to your Serenity that I noticed in all a great regard for the most serene republic and a most friendly disposition towards the Venetian name. The lord treasurer said that he recommended me to try and increase trade and to see that English ships and merchants were well treated by the ministers and officials of your Excellencies at Venice and in the other ports of your dominion in order to deprive them of opportunities for seeking better fortune at other marts. The lord Chamberlain, Lord Arlington, formerly secretary of state, touched lightly on the same subject. I did not fail to give them the fullest assurances of the attention of the Signory's public magistrates. I told them that the captains of ships and those interested in them will receive the very best treatment. I also urged them to encourage the companies of merchants to frequent the embassy and point out to me what they wanted so that I might petition your Excellencies to let them have due satisfaction.
I must add that the prince of Neoburgh also came to this house and spoke with great respect and esteem of the most serene republic. He told me he had heard from the duke, his father how high an opinion his grandfather had of it and he himself would like to see it.
In obedience to the ducali of the 8th and 14th ult. I have communicated to Sig. Alberti the public appreciation of his services. I also could say much in his praise, but he has modestly forbidden me to do so. I will be on the watch for any suggestion about giving English ships of war the convenience of Little Cephalonia for use against the Tripolitans, and will try to carry out the orders received, but I must add that I have heard nothing more about it. I will also take the first opportunity to speak as directed about the envoy Higgons.
With regard to what the ambassador at Madrid wrote about the idea of some there to induce this crown to interest itself inseparably with that of Spain, handing over the Netherlands to them and making other bargains in order to have powerful assistance in the preservation of their other territories, I will try to find out if anything has been intimated from there to the king or the ministers. But from what I am able to conclude from the constitution of the government here and its interests I have no reason to believe that any such project is feasible and still less that it would suit the Spaniards because of the great uncertainty they would be left in about the fulfilment of what was promised to them. It is practically impossible for this to be done, owing to the sudden changes to which England is subject because of the differences over religion as well as of sympathies and interests.
Ronchiglio, the envoy extraordinary of Spain, who announces that he hopes to receive the character of ordinary ambassador soon, is trying to obtain a decree that English ships and merchants shall not give any assistance to the Messinese and to exert himself not only with the king but with the ministers to pledge them to obtain peace from the king of France. Upon the first point he has received intentions from the king but upon the other his Majesty told him plainly that he had reason to suspect that the Spaniards make a show of desiring peace and would actually embrace it, but they wish beforehand to wait for some advantage which they hope to secure from their own arms or those of their allies. He came to this conclusion from his ambassador in Spain not having received, in 16 months, a categorical reply about the mediation, and what was said to his ministers in Holland and which Bergeich intimated here was not enough for him.To this Ronchiglio promptly replied that his Majesty must not entertain any doubt about the full consideration of the queen and her counsellors in this. The king retorted that if he had powers for this and would show them the business would be taken up at once.
From this and from some other talk at Court I have reason to suspect that although they do not show any objection to the mediation of the most serene republic, which appears over that of the pope, they would prefer here to be able to make the peace without her. They will not fail to try for this although it is seen to be difficult owing to the multiplicity of interests. Taken alone it is believed that peace would come about precipitously if the Dutch were compelled to come to terms with France through their present divisions and distresses, without caring about the allies.
The envoy Ronchiglio is constantly declaring that his king is disposed to peace but that he is equally determined not to set his hand to any preliminaries before one of the suggestions put forward about Furstembergh is adopted. He maintains that it is necessary to receive satisfaction for the violation of a previous compact before entering upon another one. There is no hope that he will budge from this just claim.
Here they do not at all like the successes which they hear have been won in every place by the arms and interests of the Most Christian. The parliamentarians who are ill affected to the Court say openly that the intelligence which passes with the crown of France is excessive and that they ought not to tolerate such progress. But at the same time they recognise and admit that expedients are equally difficult and dangerous. The arming of new ships, to which they incline, is found to be impossible for lack of money. Owing to the scarcity of the same commodity it is believed that the king will postpone if he does not give up altogether, his proposed visits to the country to pass the summer.
With respect to the encounters of ships in the Channel it has not been possible to obtain proof that they were French. Indeed the minister of the Most Christian here maintains that they were Dutch who flew the flag of France as a device to arouse ill feeling here. With regard to the ship captured and taken into Dover it appears that it was a long barque with only two large guns and some baskets, with 25 men of those which act as convoys to Dunkirk of the small barques destined to carry materials for the fortifications there. From the examinations it appeared that this barque had fled a long distance, seeing itself pursued at night by a ship of his Britannic Majesty which they did not recognise and suspected to be Dutch. When they actually encountered a Dutch ship in the neighbourhood of Dover the Frenchman took refuge in that port where the English ship which pursued it claimed the right to seize it because it had not lowered its sail but had continued to flee. The minister of the Most Christian accordingly demands its release and it is supposed that this will be granted as there is no reason to suppose that so small and ill furnished a craft would have ventured to fail in respect to a ship of war if it had recognised it to be English and had then taken refuge in a port of this country.
London, the 5th July, 1075.
[Italian.]
July 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
523. Paolo Sarotti, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
In obedience to the ducali of the 8th ult. I will seek opportunities to make known the cordial sentiments of the most serene republic at the promotion of the Grand Almoner Howard to the Cardinalate. I may add that while the Catholics have been greatly consoled by this event, which they attribute to a pure miracle of Almighty God, the heretics have been correspondingly cast down although outwardly they affect not to esteem that dignity. When one of the leading peers of the realm finding himself in company with other religionaries, asked the duke of Hyorch Who had asked for him, his Highness replied: It was the rest of you, by your persecutions. My lord retorted that he only regretted that the Roman Church could now boast of having a Cardinal who was a true Catholic. I may add that while this most worthy individual was considered here as a good servant of God and esteemed for his high rank and the adherents of his House, he has not been credited with any ability (non era tenuto in concetto di alcuna habilità), so there is not the smallest apprehension among the bishops or other religionaries of receiving any molestation from him. When the Earl Marshal, brother of his Eminence, asked whether he would be graciously pleased for him to write to his Majesty, the king said that he would not only be pleased to see his letters but would answer them.
Some Catholic lords want me to believe that the king would be willing for this individual or some other honest man should be appointed bishop in England with full authority over all the priests, friars and Jesuits, who would have the judgment to rule them well and the grit to enforce obedience. There are more than six hundred in this kingdom alone who live with little regular observance and attend more to their own pleasure and profit than to the salvation of souls. They cause frequent scandals and from time to time give occasion to the Protestants to resume severity against the Catholics. These, from the need they have of these religious, whether good or bad, expose themselves to any danger to enjoy their assistance, taking them in and hiding them, risking all they have to keep them in England. Thus since it is impossible to drive them out, the king would like to have some one who might devote himself to make them live in the manner which is becoming for them, banishing those who deserve it. This would be the most effective punishment for them in respect of the liberty with which they live here, going alone, wearing the sword, a curled periwig, dressed in the fashion, some of them saying as much as three masses a day, lavishly entertained at the tables of these most splendid gentlemen and adored, so to speak by their ladies who are in truth most devout and spare neither money nor attention to keep these religious in a good humour and to enjoy their punctual assistance.
London, the 5th July, 1075.
[Italian.]
July 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
524. To the Resident in England.
The Senate expects that you will have had your first audience and so the way will be open for the exercise of your abilities for the benefit of our service. In order that you may have the means to support yourself in your ministry with suitable decorum the payment for your spazzo has been delivered to your agents. The public benignity has also agreed to facilitate upon receipt of the particulars, a prompt repayment of the equipment which is usual for secretaries, so that in this also you will receive the relief that is due to you. With regard to the chapel, the Senate wishes you to follow the example of your predecessors.
Ayes, 158. Noes, 1. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
July 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
525. Girolamo Zeno, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The reply given to me about mediation has been made known to the ambassador of England, as the enclosed sheet will show.
On the attitude of the Spanish government to the peace. They consider on the other hand that if the mediators should be of opinion that it would fit in better with the common cause to associate the British crown in the defence of those dominions, it would not be well received by France which would not look with a friendly eye upon an increase in the forces of her natural enemy and rival. Neither could the Dutch take it well, out of apprehension for their manifest peril in the greatness of their immediate neighbours and of those in particular whom they have known on previous occasions to unite from a desire for their utter destruction. Thus little profit would result from negotiation in such a form. These political reflections, although they derive from private individuals come to be pondered over by those of the government.
Madrid, the 10th July, 1675.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.526. The Conde de Peñaranda to Don Guilliam Godolphin.
Upon the occasion of the ambassador of Venice having placed in the hands of the queen my mistress a memorial and paper of the republic offering mediation for the adjustment of the peace, her Majesty decided to answer the republic, intimating that she had admitted the pontifical mediation from the beginning of the war, because his Holiness had offered it then. At the same time that of the republic will be agreeable to her Majesty, always provided that the other princes who are interested in the settlement of a general adjustment concur and approve of admitting her and that the fighting ceases. Her Majesty will take care to inform the republic of the place of the congress when it has been indicated by the common consent of the allies, in order that she may send her ministers there. As the queen my mistress wished his Britannic Majesty to be informed of what has passed upon this subject I am making this communication to your Excellency by her order. Compliments.
Madrid, the 18th June, 1675.
[Spanish.]
July 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
527. Paolo Sarotti, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The king set out on Saturday for Portsmouth with the intention of making the journey by sea, as he takes great delight in navigation. But in order to avoid the numerous windings of this river he went to Whitehall and then travelled by coach to Gravesend. He took with him his brother and the duke of Monmouth besides many gentlemen. He embarked on a frigate followed by ten other vessels, ships and yachts. When he was a good way out at sea at night, a dangerous storm sprung up and he was compelled to take refuge in the Downs next morning, which was Sunday. He resumed his voyage on Monday but was compelled by contrary winds, after much striving to turn back and cast anchor opposite Deal castle. With an appearance of good weather he ventured to sea again on Monday and was seen to pass before Dover but as the winds still continued to be contrary to his journey and stormy and there was no news of his Majesty for several hours, anxiety was universal. This morning, by the blessing of God, and with unspeakable relief it was learned that on Tuesday night he had taken refuge at St. Helens in the Isle of Wight, as he was unable to get into Portsmouth. But it is believed that he has now arrived there because the weather has changed. (fn. 1)
Thinking it necessary to make some public demonstration of his feelings about the recent disorders which took place in the Houses of parliament and desiring in particular to make them known to the Lower without giving them anything to lay hold of that any decision to its disparagement had been taken by the royal ministers, he announced a few hours before this journey the banishment from Court of two leading gentlemen who are members of that House who were among the most evil disposed, (fn. 2) and from being young and erratic might be charged with other errors which had incurred his Majesty's displeasure.
As a very sensible punishment for the lieutenant of the Tower and to deprive the Lower House of again exercising authority over it the king with commendable prudence, has revived the post of constable of the Tower which had been vacant for many years giving it to Lord Northampton, an old and deserving subject of the crown. (fn. 3) In this way, under the title of rewarding him, a superior has been placed over the lieutenant, whose command and benefit from the Tower will now cease. Thus he will be obliged either to resign the post or to serve in it without any profit and entirely subordinate to the constable and there will be in the Tower a peer of the realm who will endeavour to combine the service of his sovereign with the advantage of the House of Lords and his colleagues.
With my preoccupation over the numerous visits which I had in those days I forgot to inform your Serenity that the lawyers who were arrested were released immediately after the dissolution of parliament. These with other supporters of the Court as well as of the House of Lords are studying and writing upon the question of privileges in order, when parliament meets again, to have arguments and writings to destroy any pretended jurisdiction of the House of Commons. The friends of the latter, none the less, are not neglecting to do the same against the authority of the Upper House investigating and turning over ancient codices. These rivalries and disputes are very distasteful to the Court as it is feared that when the Houses meet again time will be wasted over them instead of being devoted to the ways of supplying the king with money of which he is in need for wiping out his debts and for other requirements of the crown and himself. On this account the royal ministers and others who are anxious to serve his Majesty are not forgetting to go about making inquiries and suggesting expedients for smoothing the way for the conservation of what is desired and every day they win over some of the most stubborn.
They are watching with interest to see what effects will be produced by the marriage of the king of Sweden to the princess of Denmark. (fn. 4) Although it is understood that the Dane has declared that this will not prevent him from carrying out what he has undertaken in his treaties with the Dutch, from whom he has already received the money granted to him it is believed that he will consider the possibility of keeping it on account of old debts which he claims and that he will not enter into other pledges with Sweden for though it suits him to stand armed he does not want to look for trouble and still less to engage his scanty forces in battle.
The Cavalier Temple, ambassador in Holland, having come to Court with the king's permission upon his private affairs, is being urged to return to his residence and in particular to try and dispose the prince of Orange, in his own interest, to a more confidential correspondence and a closer intelligence with this crown. They regret to see that he is not well counselled and they have serious misgivings that with his affairs growing worse they may hear that he has lost his popularity with the people which he used to enjoy and that the opposition party is gaining strength.
On learning here of the death of the duke of Savoy and that a gentleman has been sent from that Court on a complimentary mission to the royal House here, they have chosen in response the brother of my lord del Bagno, brother-in-law of the Cavalier Higgons, who will leave when the gentleman in question arrives. (fn. 5) And now they are going into mourning.
The prince of Neoburgh, after having entertained the king, his brother, Prince Roberto and the first gentlemen of the kingdom at a most sumptuous banquet, which lasted until daylight, has gone off to France with the intention of going on to Italy. I must not forget to add that the corsairs of Barbary, guided by a renegade of Ostend, have put in an appearance as far as the parts near here, but we do not hear that they have so far taken any prizes or done any harm. (fn. 6) London, the 12th July, 1675.
[Italian.]
July 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
528. To the Resident in England.
With regard to the letter of Sig. Alberti you can tell him in reply that in view of the audience you have had of the king his employment ceases and with it the salary which he enjoyed for Archives. the same. For the rest we are sure that he will exert himself to disentangle his affairs with all speed so that he may return to his native land soon.
Ayes, 138. Noes, 3. Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
July 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
529. Paolo Sarotti, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The king put in at Portsmouth after having weathered two dangerous storms on the voyage. There he saw the launch of the new great ship of war called the Royal James, which will be furnished with 100 pieces of ordnance. After issuing orders for the fitting of other craft as well as for the completion of a fine yacht which is being built for the Most Christian, (fn. 7) he decided to return by sea because of his liking for navigation and his knowledge of it. He arrived here safely on Tuesday and received the compliments of some of the foreign ministers, among whom I chanced to be the first.
That evening the Spanish envoy Ronquillo had a long talk with him apart. He took as his text the news of the blow struck by the elector of Brandenburg against the Swedes, (fn. 8) suggesting to his Majesty that the conjuncture was favourable for making proposals for peace. He renewed to the king the assurances of the reliance that the crown of Spain placed in his interposition and begged him to do so with vigour. The king in reply said something about his mediation not having been definitely accepted as yet. When Ronquillo tried to remove all his doubts about this, the king took time to decide. On the following day he sent to tell him. As no preliminaries for the peace had been started it was easy to make calculations and suppositions. Owing to the distance of the Courts of the emperor from the kings of Spain and of Sweden the campaign will go forward before their decisions can be had. It seemed to him therefore that Ronquillo, together with the other ministers of Spain and of the allies in Flanders and Holland might so arrange matters among themselves that the crowns and princes interested should give instructions to their ambassadors and envoys resident at this Court and should treat in the meantime about the preliminaries and arrange them through his interposition here. The king also made divers suggestions to Ronquillo about the terms of the peace, but so remote from the pretensions of the Spaniards that they were flatly rejected by him. He also suggested to his Majesty that as he had ascertained the intentions of all the allies except those of the king of France, he should ask him for his also and proceed in the matter with true mediation, treating everyone equally.
I succeeded in gathering this much from a royal minister and I have had confirmation from talk with Ronquillo himself, who already shows some confidence with me. The ambassador of Holland also has exerted himself with the king no less than with the ministers to incite them to employ vigorous offices with the Most Christian for the peace, but always asking for the restitution of Mastricht. In discussing the terms for this Ronquillo says that the pretensions of the crown of Spain will be that everything shall be reduced at least to the footing of the treaty of Aix la Chapelle and that in Flanders matters shall be so disposed about the release, exchange or demolition of some of the places there that Brussels and Ghent shall not have to remain a frontier in the future.
There being no minister of the emperor here Ronquillo is supplying the place of one. In this capacity he claims that for the just satisfaction of his Imperial Majesty as well as of the other princes of the empire everything should be brought back to the state in which it was left by the peace of Westphalia, by the restitution of Lorraine and Burgundy. With regard to the help given to the Messinese by the king of France he says that he hopes the need for treating will cease because they will soon be reduced to obedience.
This minister states frankly that the Spaniards are ill pleased with the course taken by the prince of Orange. His Highness had lost timein insisting on going a long way about to attempt the relief of Limburgh when it might easily have been calculated that it was practically impossible to arrive in time. Villa Hermosa had wished at the time that some diversion should be made for France, which would have produced better results. The united forces of the Spaniards and Dutch in Flanders were in no way inferior to those of the Most Christian and they might hope for much if they acted upon uniform plans. But it mattered little for them to be united in a body if the leaders were not at one about the way to employ them.
Rovigni, an old and vigilant minister with abundance of adherents here, never ceases to offer vigorous opposition to all the divulgations and insinuations of the Spaniard. With much admired and highly commendable subtlety he accosts him frequently in the royal apartments and they have long talks together as if they were the best of friends. It has been noted that Rovigni has had very long conferences with the ambassador of Sweden since the news of victory won by the elector of Brandenburg over the army of that crown.
Ronquillo and the ambassador of Holland make much of the envoy of Denmark owing to misgivings that the king, his master, owing to the marriage with Sweden or from other interests, may withdraw from the treaties concluded. Something has been disclosed of fresh negotiations of the duke of Neuburgh with France, but his minister here denies it flatly.
With regard to the mediation of the most serene republic for peace I keep finding that the ministers here would like it to come to nothing. With regard to Spain they take pains to make it believed that the queen has approved of the offer but has not definitely accepted it. Ronquillo himself told me this, saying that information had not reached him from Spain. So I told him in reply that I knew for certain that at the end of May the Count of Pignoranda had gone to the house of the ambassador of your Serenity to tell him in the queen's name that her Majesty agreed to embrace the mediation of the most serene republic for the peace negotiations in the same manner as that of the pope had been received and that they would inform him of the decision about the place of meeting when that had been decided, in order that a minister might be sent. Ronquillo expressed his gratitude for this communication. He added that he thought they would drop their ambiguity here or they would make a mystery about Pignoranda having told the ambassador that they would inform him of the place of meeting when that had been definitely settled. As that has not yet taken place a way will be left open for England to procure the peace without the mediation of others if a conclusion can be obtained without a formal congress. From his acts and opinions I have understood that this intention of the English did not please him and he entertains the greatest suspicion that they may cause the Dutch to fall into some separate agreement with France, as he does not believe that the return of Temple here from the Hague was for his private concerns only.
Two days ago the king went off to Windsor and yesterday there followed him the queen, the duke of Hyorch with his wife and daughters and all the Court. It is expected that they will stay away from London until October.
The ministers of the crowns and of foreign princes who, in addition to the one of your Serenity, now number eleven, have had quarters assigned to them by order of his Majesty, but they pay a stiff rent to the owners of the houses. They will all go, either to-day or to-morrow. The marshal of the Court came to offer quarters to me also but I was obliged with shame and regret to excuse myself, for lack of public instructions and assistance on such an occasion. I propose however to go there from time to time and to stay for a few days, otherwise it would be quite impossible to find out here what will be done at the Court because all the nobility which does not follow it are going away to enjoy their country houses. I am not without hope that the public generosity will recognise my zeal for their service by making me a present of the cost.
London, the 19th July, 1675.
[Italian.]
July 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
530. Ascanio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Some rumours were current here last week that England might force Holland to protest to the Spaniards that they will detach themselves from the alliance if Spain does not agree to expedients to quieten the noise of arms. No more has been heard about this in the current week. It may be that the Spaniards are aware of negotiations and have been able to apply themselves to find means to cause the Provinces to desist from listening to any negotiations that are not fully in accord with their satisfaction and their views.
Paris, the 24th July, 1675.
[Italian.]
July 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
531. To the Resident in England.
The Senate approves of your reply to the lord treasurer and lord chamberlain on the subject of trade and the good treatment of English ships and merchants. We do not know by whom such remarks may have been prompted. If you happen to find out and anything more is said to you, you will inform us about it in detail and we shall not fail, in conformity with orders which have been issued on every other occasion, to charge the magistrates who are concerned to keep a close watch on this important matter, while at every opportunity you will be able to confirm our intentions and our perfect disposition towards the nation.
That a copy of what the Resident Sarotti writes about English trade, ships and merchants be sent to the Five Savii alla Mercanzia with orders for them to see that the nation receives the very best treatment, in accordance with instructions frequently given, and to report in writing those who are found disobeying such orders.
Ayes, 104. Noes, 0. Neutral, 42.
[Italian.]
July 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
532. Paolo Sarotti, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
In obedience to the ducali of the 29th ult. I will keep on the watch to see and communicate what is being arranged against the Tripolitans. This week all the foreign ministers have gone to Windsor. The last was Ronquillo, who went more unwillingly than the others. Every one complains of staying there with many inconveniences and at a very great expense while it is difficult to do business, because the king evades it as much as possible, not loving affairs and unwilling to be disturbed from his pleasures. Some of the ministers I saw at their houses before they left and others came here courteously to take leave. They expect to be away for two months at least, their various quarters distributed about different villages near Windsor, only the king remaining at the castle with his household and the most necessary servants.
Ronquillo more than any one else let himself go to me. He said that the king has run away from business. That among the royal ministers there is not one who cares to apply himself with zeal and the attention that is due to current affairs, which are understood by few. So they go on, living from one day to another without caring to think of what will follow. Practically all of them were of the French Court and the neglect of public affairs was universal. So one may believe that if the king of England should succeed in having the honour of concluding the peace, it will be by accident not by industry.
Ronquillo also complains that he can find no one to listen to the proposals which he has to make for discussion and support, but they only do so to satisfy their personal curiosity and possibly to communicate them afterwards to the partisans of France. He is therefore waiting with impatience for the time when parliament will meet again, hoping to find some there, and particularly in the Lower House, who will be on good terms with him. These and other like opinions he poured out to me, but by way of confidence and to blow off steam (di sfogo).
Rovigni on the other hand was the first to follow the Court. He neglects no opportunity of cultivating not only the king but the ministers. He rejoices precisely that they are not doing any business but rather avoid it because his own business is that they shall not apply themselves to the means of coercing his king to accept a peace differing from his own intentions.
The envoy of Denmark has made known the decision of his king to make war on Sweden, the adjustment made with the duke of Holstein Gottorp for this purpose and the putting to sea of twenty ships of war and his firm determination to act with vigour, as he has 18,000 men well armed. But upon these matters I must refer to what will be imparted to your Excellencies in greater detail and better authenticated. Here they have issued from the press a prolix account of the victory won by Brandenburg. It is a long pamphlet of many sheets in the form of a dialogue, showing such partiality for the elector and such strong prejudice against the Swedes, both in their negotiations and in their treatment of the inhabitants of the country of Brandenburg, that nothing could be more injurious than the opinions expressed in them. They are in English and the author is known. But here every one can print with impunity what he likes against any one he likes, not excepting parliament or the king himself. They have greatly offended the ambassador of Sweden, but although it has been suggested to him to print others of his own sort, he has considered it more prudent to affect to care nothing about such made-up and mendacious slanders especially as they are universally applauded. The enthusiasm felt among the English, apart from the Court, for successes of the allies over the French and their friends could not be greater.
London, the 26th July, 1675.
[Italian.]
July 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
533. Ascanio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The ministers here point out that there is no disposition on the part of the allies to treat and that they show no desire for peace. Here there is no lack of desire for it and they are using all the pressure they can upon England in order to get her to interest herself more warmly in trying to get the others into a state of mind which will lead them to agree to more advantageous measures. But is is not thought that she can bring them to this, especially in a state of affairs in which the confederates flatter themselves that they are able to reap advantages. If his Britannic Majesty could use his influence to encourage the disposition of the Dutch for peace he would not leave any means untried to bring it to bear again; but he perceives that they will not consent so readily to take steps which might excite the indignation of the world against them, now that they find themselves posted in the midst of their allies.
Paris, the 31st July, 1675.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The king sailed in the Greyhound, Capt. Clements. The duke of York was in the Anne. The king was separated from the rest and lost to sight on Wednesday, 30 June, o.s. He landed in the Isle of Wight on Friday and reached Portsmouth on Saturday. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1675–6, pp. 184, 190. London Gazette, July 1–5, 1675.
2 From Sarotti's second despatch of 1 November below, one of these was William, lord Cavendish. It seems probable that the other was Sir Thomas Meres, who was associated with Cavendish in the Howard case. Cobbett: Parliamentary History, IV, 745.
3 The order for the warrant was issued on 19 June, o.s., and the warrant itself is dated 16 July, o.s. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1675–6, pp. 169, 218.
4 The marriage between Charles XI, king of Sweden, and Ulrica Eleanora, youngest daughter of Frederick III of Denmark, did not actually take place until 6 May, 1680.
5 Charles Emanuel II, duke of Savoy, died on 12 June. The envoy was Bernard Grenville, groom of the bedchamber, brother of John Grenville, earl of Bath. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1675–6, page 246. The gentleman from Savoy was the count of St. Maurice.
6 A small vessel of Scilly reported meeting two “Turks” men-of-war, of 40 and 50 guns apiece, about 17 leagues off Lands End. They took a compass and some beef and pork for which they promised to pay, and behaved quite civilly. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1675–6, page 154.
7 One of the two that were being built for the ornamental water at Versailles. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1675–6, page 195. Antony Deane, the ship builder, records their arrival in a letter to Williamson of 10 August. “We arrived at Paris yesterday. As to the business of the yachts, one of them is at the side of Versailles water ready to be put in so soon as it is cleaned, instead of going to St. Cloud. The yacht was taken out of the water at St. Germain and so drawn up the hills and bad roads in two days. Some slight damage and the axletrees of the machine will soon be mended, and then fetch the other from the same place.” S.P. France, Vol. CXL.
8 The victory of Fehrbellin on 18 June.


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June 1675