Henry VIII
September 1524, 1-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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J. S. Brewer (editor)

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1875

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'Henry VIII: September 1524, 1-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 4: 1524-1530 (1875), pp. 274-283. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=91206 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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September 1524

1 Sept.
Cal. B. III. 96.
B. M.
613. WILLIAM HALS to NORFOLK.
Had written in his letters, Tuesday, 23 Aug., by the information of the abbot of Paisley, that Argyle, Murray, and lord Maxwell had proposed to seize the goods of the bishop of St. Andrews. It is not yet done, as the Bishop has given 20,000 crowns to the Queen; to George Shawe her servant, kinsman to the abbot of Paisley, money to purchase land of 20l. per ann., Scotch money; to the earl of Argyle, while he is here, weekly, 100l. Scots. Murray is well rewarded. Unless the King writes to Margaret it will not be done. If the bishop gets his liberty, as he is a man of great wisdom, he will undoubtedly do much harm. Will be glad to know whether the demands of the ambassadors (to be declared by Patrick Sinclair, Cassillis, and others, who will be at Berwick on Saturday next,) shall take effect. Patrick Sinclair has been sent to him by the Queen, to ascertain his feeling. She sent for him yesterday, when Cavendish and Carlisle took their leave, stating that she had written to the King, and commanded him to stay. Has received a letter from Cassillis, desiring the safe-conduct, spoken of in Hals's last letter, might be at Berwick on Saturday next. Islay herald will fetch it. The abbot of Paisley desires Norfolk will request the Queen that he may have the treasurership which is yet undisposed of. Has spoken to the Queen (as Norfolk desired in his last letter, dated at Warkworth) about the sending ambassadors to England for a perpetual peace. She told him Parliament had determined upon it. Before Albany left he sent a herald to Denmark, who returned yesternight to Edinburgh. Edinburgh, St. Giles' Day, 1 Sept.
Hol., pp. 3. Add. Endd.
1 Sept.
Arundel MS.
26, f. 44.
B. M.
614. THOMAS HANNIBAL, LL.D.
On St. Giles' Day, 1 Sept. 1524, 16 Hen. VIII., the Pope's ambassador, Dr. Thos. Hanyball, who brought the sacred rose from Rome, was received as follows. At Dover he was met by Sir Edw. Gilford; at Canterbury, by the bp. of Rochester, the abbot of St. Augustine's, the prior of Christchurch, and lord Cobham. At Blachethe, Sept. 1, there rode out of the city to meet him the earl of Essex, the bp. of London's chancellor with 30 horses, as the Bishop himself was sick, the bp. of Exeter, Dr. John Veysy, the lord of St. John's, lord Roos, lord Fitzwater, lord Marny, Sir Andrew Windesore, Sir John Veer, Sir _ Maners, Sir Wm. Paston, Sir Thos. Tyrell, Sir John Daunce, Sir Robt. Jonys, and others of the King's servants, and certain officers of arms without their coats of arms, for it is not usual for them to be worn when the King is not present at such ceremonies. As the noblemen conveyed him through the city to his house at St. John's, the lord mayor, aldermen, and crafts kept the usual order.
P. 1.
2 Sept.
Cal. B. VI. 336.
B. M.
St. P. IV. 120.
615. WOLSEY to [NORFOLK].
Has received his letters of the 15th, 19th, and 26th ult., with those that accompanied them. The King is much pleased with his diligence. Has been somewhat the longer in answering them, as the King had resolved to make no change in his policy; and Sir Gregory de Cassalis lately arrived here with letters from Bourbon, the marquis of Pescara, and Pace, relating the prosperous success of the Duke, who has not only gained all the principal towns of Provence, except Marseilles and Arles, but has got the whole country at his devotion, and intends to go to Lyons and offer battle to the French king. The King is, therefore, strongly urged to make use of the opportunity to invade France, which, by the advice of his Council, he intends to do, and is getting ready lymoners and carriages, retaining lanceknights, &c.; for which reason Sir Richard Jerningham is despatched to the Lady Margaret, with orders to demand the 3,000 horsemen and 1,000 foot of the Emperor's to join the King's army. Cassalis is also re-dispatched to Bourbon, to obtain precise knowledge of his proceedings, on which the advancing or not advancing of the King's army will depend.
The confirmation of the young king of Scots in his dignity is much to the King's satisfaction. The Queen and Arran have acquitted themselves well, both in that and in the imprisonment of the bishops of St. Andrews and Aberdeen. Norfolk is to tell her, the King strongly advises her not to set them again at liberty, otherwise they will seek revenge. The confiscation of their goods will be an assistance to the young King, who is not very well provided of treasure, besides being a terror to others. The King thinks that to defeat intrigues for their liberation the Queen should get them sent to Berwick; after which Albany would not dare to land in Scotland, even if he had come to the shore; and if any intrigue should be got up by their friends they would be glad to write and appease it; otherwise, means could be found, if necessary, of depriving them entirely of their dignities. No one, however, must be made privy to this design, except those who have the doing of it. It could easily be brought about by the lord Maxwell, and the two bishops lodged in Berwick, before it was known in Scotland; or if conveyed part of the way in disguise, Norfolk could send a company to meet them.
Sends two safe-conducts for the Earl Marshal's son, in whose favor the king and queen of Scots have written, and for the merchants for whom Margaret wrote to Norfolk. The King is much displeased at the taking of the ships coming from Iceland. He wishes Norfolk to write to the king and queen of Scotland, showing that they were taken during a truce, when such conduct was not expected, and urging them not to deal extremely, or to stick in such small things. If, however, entire restitution cannot be obtained, it may be arranged that rewards be given to the takers, and the rest restored. If no compromise can be effected, means should be found to get the ships and fish back again into the Englishman's hands, otherwise great scarcity is likely to ensue. Norfolk must show all cordiality to the king and queen of Scots, Arran, and their adherents, giving them fair answers, warning the Queen not to ratify anything with France, and urging them to hasten the sending of their ambassadors. As to Angus, as the king of Scots is thus confirmed in his government by Parliament, Norfolk may entertain him for a season at Newcastle, unless he be very desirous to return to the King, in which case Norfolk can send him to London, accompanied by some of his servants, on giving Wolsey previous notice.
It is proposed that in the army to be sent to France there shall be 200 light horse sent out of the North. Norfolk is to take order with Dacres about their selection. They are to be put under command of Sir Christopher Dacres, and to be ready to proceed to Dover on brief warning. At Canterbury or London they shall have coasts and conduct. At the More, 2 September. Signed.
P.S.—Has just received Norfolk's letter dated at Newcastle, the last day of this month (sic), with one sent to Norfolk by Wm. Hals, and a copy of a letter, "seeming to be devised to the King's highness from the Lords of Scotland." Need add no further instructions touching the two bishops. It is well that Angus comes to the King of his own will. Norfolk may gratify the queen of Scots by changing the 200 men of the guard to 100 gentlemen, each with a servant, and 16d. a day for himself and his man. Norfolk shall pay them from month to month, and Dacre after his return, for which Wolsey will move the King, thinking his presence at court will be more beneficial when the Scotch ambassadors come up. As for the high demands of the Scots, they will be qualified when the ambassadors come.
2 Sept.
Cal. E. II. 107.
B. M.
616. FITZWILLIAM to [WOLSEY].
(First leaf wanting.) * * * "far as Bulleyn, where they found no g ... returned home, and brought with them about six score cow ..." Gives an account of certain alarms made by the French at Ringisham, in the Bullennoys. Gave notice to the lord deputy of Calais of their intentions. Has heard from St. Omer's that the King intends to send over an army. Wishes to join it. Divers gentlemen have offered to serve. Begs his Grace to be a mean for him [to come] over into England, if it be only for six days. The French king is gone towards Mons. de B[ourbon, and] will never turn his face till such time as he h ... with him. Vendosmes is appointed to keep these frontiers. Guisnes, 2 Sept.
Mutilated, pp. 2.
2 Sept.
R. O.
617. ADRIEN DE CROY to WOLSEY.
The English ambassador is sending the news of the army. Writes merely to assure him of his devotion to the King's cause. Toulon, 2 Sept.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.: A Mons. Mons. le Legat. Sealed.
2 Sept.
Eras. Ep.
p. 800.
xviii. 52.
618. ERASMUS to WOLSEY.
In compliance with his and the King's advice, has finished and published his book De Libero Arbitrio,—a bold act as Germany now stands. Has not prefixed any dedication to it, in order to avoid calumny: otherwise would have dedicated it to Wolsey or the Pope. Is glad that his friend Livinus pleases Wolsey. He made great progress under Erasmus. He might assist the studies of Wolsey's relative (cognati tui, qu. Winter?) in Louvain. Begs Wolsey will allow him leisure for study. Sends one copy of his work to Wolsey, and another to the King. Basle, 2 Sept. 1524.
Lat.
3 Sept.
R. O.
619. FITZWILLIAM and JERNINGHAM to the DUKE OF SUFFOLK.
Jerningham arrived last night. Fitzwilliam immediately went to him, according to Wolsey's orders. Instead of levying 3,000 lanzknechts, think it would be better to levy 2,000 horse, and pay them the wages of the foot, while lady Margaret should levy the said footmen with the wages of the horse. Suffolk promised to inform Wolsey of this plan, as Jerningham's instructions are contrary to it. The horsemen, being in the King's wages, will serve better.
In Fitzwilliam's hand:—Hears the King intends to leave Sir Richard and Sir Robert Wingfield at home. Advises him to recollect what need he will have of Sir Richard "for his wyse counsell and is pene for makyng of your letters, wyche ye shall fynd to marvellos a lake if ye mes hym;" and how he would need Sir Robert for dispatching other affairs. He would wish for them a thousand times before he comes home. He must not reckon on Fitzwilliam or Jerningham, for their charge will prevent them from serving his purpose. Hopes he may be well supplied with victual, men, and money. Calais, 3 Sept. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.
3 Sept.
R. O.
620. FITZWILLIAM and JERNINGHAM to WOLSEY.
Jerningham arrived last night. Wish to alter the arrangements for levying troops, as stated in their letter to Suffolk.
Fitzwilliam hears from Bawdewyn Willoughby that the King "was contented I should come over for six days, and that your Grace said you thought, when I had spoken with Sir Ric. Jerningham, I would not so do." Is obliged to come for want of money, which he will provide with the help of his friends, without asking the King for any. Will then "put the house of Guisnes in such order and surety" that there shall be no danger thereof. Will start in four days, unless he hears to the contrary. As the King wishes him to go to the field, can do no good here till they set forward. Has been so continually on the field that his horses will require a fortnight's rest. Calais, 3 Sept. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: To my lord Cardinal. Endd.
4 Sept.
Calig. B. VI.
414.
B. M.
Rym. XIV. 21.
621. SCOTLAND.
Indenture made between Thos. duke of Norfolk, Thos. lord Dacre, on the one side, and Gilbert earl of Cassillis, Sir William Scot, and Adam Ottirborne, for an abstinence from war, to endure three months ending 1 Dec.
4 Sept.
Eras. Ep.
p. 813.
622. ERASMUS to WARHAM.
Supposes he has got Erasmus's portrait. Was harassed with a cough in April, and then attacked by the stone. Has three sets of enemies: the scholars at Rome, who do not care for theology; monks and others; and, worse than all, the Lutherans. Has been, well treated by Clement VII. and Francis I., and received 100 cr. from archduke Ferdinand. Speaks of his treatise De Libero Arbitrio. Has received from the Archbishop 10l. by Potkin, and 10l. by Francis Bercmann. Has had a horse from him, free from all mortal sins, except gluttony and indolence. He has all the virtues of a good confessor,—is sober and chaste, never bites and never kicks. Is glad that he has completed the Epistles of St. Jerome. Basle, 4 Sept. 1524.
Lat.
4 Sept.
Eras. Ep.
p. 814.
xviii. 47.
623. ERASMUS to FISHER.
Was sorry to read these words in his letter, "Utinam vivum me reperiat liber !" Heard of his illness from his servant. Thinks his austerities are too great, and that his illness arises chiefly from the locality. The sea is near him, and a muddy shore, and his library is surrounded with glass windows, which let in the keen air at every chink, and are very injurious to people of weak health. I am quite aware what an assiduous attendant you are in your library, which is your paradise. I should have a fit of sickness were I to stay in it three hours. A boarded and wainscoted chamber would be much better; brick and plaister give out a noxious vapour. It is important to the church, in the penury of good bishops, that Fisher should take care of himself. Had a very servere fit of the stone last May. With better wine it has gone off. Speaks of his numerous enemies, and the extension of Luther's doctrine in Savoy, Lorraine, France, and even Milan. A certain Phallic Frenchman has thrown Burgundy into confusion. I had resolved to abstain from controversy, and employ myself in classical studies, but am compelled to put together some remarks upon preaching. Has published a treatise De Libero Arbitrio. Basle, 4 Sept. 1524.
Lat.
4 Sept.
Eras. Ep.
p. 813.
xviii. 48.
624. ERASMUS to TUNSTAL.
Has published his book De Libero Arbitrio. Would like to have Tunstal's opinion of it. Cannot get a copy of Johannes Damascenus. Has been suffering from the stone. Francis I. has shown him great kindness, but the King is wholly occupied by war, winter is approaching, and Erasmus does not care to move. If he did, the Lutherans would say he had done so through fear. Basle, 4 Sept. 1524.
Lat.
4 Sept.
Eras. Ep.
p. 815.
625. ERASMUS to PACE.
Wishes him joy of his advancement. If my commentaries have arrived, leave them in More's custody. Retain Linacre's friendship, and Grocyn's, if you can. I should always be glad to have such men my friends; and I do not care to remember what each of them, I know not by whose suggestion, may have attempted against me. This rests on certainty, not on suspicion. I have made honorable mention of Linacre in my notes on St. Jerome. In your intercourse with the cardinal of York, fac Paceum agas. Basle, 4 Sept. 1524.
Lat.
4 Sept.
Eras. Ep.
p. 816.
xviii. 46.
626. ERASMUS to RICHARD BERE, ABBOT OF GLASTONBURY. (fn. 1)
Was induced to seek his friendship at Pace's suggestion, when he and Erasmus were at Ferrara. Was not successful, perhaps because he employed a blind guide, Bernard André, the Frenchman, formerly a tutor, of mean abilities, to Prince Arthur. Erasmus, besides, was offended with some remarks made by a chaplain of the Abbot, respecting his edition of St. Jerome. Has never ceased, however, to have a great regard for him, in consequence of what he has heard from Pace and Zachary Frisius, who have frequently spoken highly of the Abbot. Basle, octave of St. Augustine, 1524.
Lat.
4 Sept.
R. O.
627. SIR ROBT. WINGFIELD to HENRY VIII.
Thanks him for remitting the pension which he was bound to pay to Sir Nicholas Carow, master of the horse, of which act of liberality his brother Sir Richard, chancellor of the duchy, has informed him. Calais, 4 Sept. 1524.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
5 Sept.
Eras. Ep.
p. 816.
xviii. 41.
628. ERASMUS to TONEYS, of Wolsey's Council.
William Burbank has never ceased to reproach me for never having sent you a letter,—you who have been a candid friend and sure patron to me. I have been greatly occupied. Sir Thomas More always speaks highly of you to me. Basle, 5 Sept. 1524.
Lat.
5 Sept.
R. O.
Rym. XIV. 23.
629. SCOTLAND.
Bond of Gilbert earl of Cassillis Sir Wm. Scot of Balwery, and Adam Otterburn, of Auldham, commissioners for taking an abstinence of war for [three] months from 4 Sept. 1524, that at the expiration of the said term, 2 Dec. next, the king of Scotland shall send ambassadors to treat for a longer peace with England. Berwick, 5 Sept. 1524. Signed.
Mutilated.
5 Sept.
Calig. B. I. 40.
B. M.
630. GONZOLLES to JAMES V.
Found, whilst hunting, one of his valets de chambre, named Moray, who had come from Berwick. Is at Dunbar for no other purpose but to promote the King's welfare. If his Council were as faithful to him as he is, they would not raise such an outcry against Albany's coming, which is for the good of his kingdom. Is informed if Albany comes they have promised England to deliver James. Begs him to be on his guard, for if he goes there he will never escape, but bring misery on himself and his kingdom. Begs pardon for writing thus. Is convinced that Albany is entirely devoted to the King's interest. Dunbar Castle, 5 Sept.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: "Au Roy."
* The whole of this letter is copied by Tuke in the margin, the original being very badly written.
5 Sept.
R. O.
631. SIR WM. SANDYS to WOLSEY.
On Saturday, 27 Aug., a sergeant of the mayor of Calais met at St. Omer's, at the sign of "The Boote," one Henry Crookeshanke, who has been a spy for a long time, and who, after asking him if he was sworn to the king of England, told him that he was retained to bring to England an Almain who was most secret with Ric. de la Pole,—that he had him within six miles of the town,—had no money for their expences, and as Sir Ric. Wingfield, whom he knew, was departed, he wished the sergeant to ask Sandys whether he should bring him to Calais, or not. Sent Robert Elvish, an archer on horseback, to him, with money to bring the prisoner hither; but he told him that no one should see the man till he had been to Wolsey; that he took ship at Roan, but was compelled by the weather to return, and come through Flanders; and told Elvish to ask the governor of this town whether he should bring the man to take shipping here, or at Dunkirk, or elsewhere. Elvish answered, by Sandys' orders, that he should come hither, and offered to go with him to the place where he had left the Almain, with two spare horses, to pay their expences, and bring them the shortest way; which Crookeshanke refused, saying that every time he had come to the Deputy with news, he had disappointed him of his thanks by sending them to Wolsey.
On his return, to sent him Dunkirk to bring Crookeshancke and the Almain either to Calais or to Wolsey; but after waiting at Dunkirk three days, Elvish returned to St. Omer's, and was told by Crookeshancke's hostess that he had desired her to say that he had gone two days before with another man. But in fact there was no one with him. Has sent Elvish back to try and find him, that he may be sent to Wolsey to be examined; for he said that there would be war in every place; that before the league between the King and the French king, Richard de la Pole came from over the mountains to the French court; and "whereas the French king would have had him to have lain with him, whereunto he said that he was not worthy to lie with his Grace, and the French king clapped him on the shoulder, saying, 'My lord of Suffolk, I woll set you into England with 40,000 men within few days;'" that he met at Rouen two London apprentices, who asked for Ric. de la Pole, saying they would go to him as many more do who go by Winchelsea and Rye; that the bastard of Scotland came by the coast of Normandy to provide ships in all possible haste for Albany, and is now gone to Scotland to provide for the Duke's reception; that Albany is at St. Quentins with 800 spears and 4,000 foot, and intends to depart as soon as his ships are rigged; that the French with the Bastard, on returning, took all the "corvers" of Flanders they met, in the name of the king of Denmark; and that many French "haynes" in Scarborough haven send home their nets, and are rigging for the war, so that the Flemings dare not go to sea and complain of the King allowing the French to be there. There is a rumor that garrisons are being sent to Tirwyn, Tournay, Abbeville, and Mutterèll. There were lately sent from France 14 carts laden with stone and powder for Tournay, but they were met and taken by the captain of Lisle, at the straits where the King passed with his army. Does not know whether he keeps them, or has delivered them up. Calais, 5 Sept. Signed.
Pp. 4. Add.: To my lord [Cardinal's] grace, l[egate de latere] and Cha[ncellor of] England.
5 Sept.
Bradford,
p. 103.
632. CHARLES V. to BOURBON.
I send you a duplicate of my last. I have heard De Lurcy's charge, and given him an answer. As to your journey hither, it will be necessary to watch the turn of affairs. I think the king of England will supply the money, and make good the treaty. I am informed that he has sent you 200,000 crowns, and I have ordered the viceroy of Naples to see that there be no default in this matter. The marquis of Pescara and Moncada advise that the Germans on the frontiers of Languedoc should be sent to you, and I have taken steps accordingly. I am satisfied with what you have done with the marquis del Guasto, and have appointed him captain general of the infantry. I would have gone to Barcelona, as you wish, but must conclude the marriage of my sister Katherine. I have, besides, been suffering with a fever. For the money sent you from England, and from me, you must do with it what you think proper. From the duke of Milan I hear a bad character of Messer Garnier Guasq. I am writing to Pace, who is with you, in order that he may look well to the contribution which his master is bound to pay. I am also sending a duplicate of a despatch to the duke of Monego. Valladolid, 5 Sept.
5 Sept.
R. O.
633. FIELD OF CLOTH OF GOLD.
Warrant to Sir Wm. Holgyll, clk., master of the Savoy, to call to account all those who have the handling of church moneys for the building of a royal edifice in the marches of Calais, near Guisnes, all receivers of silks, &c.; with licence to commit to ward all recusants. Windsor, 5 Sept. 16 Hen. VIII. Signed by the King.
Parchment.
5 Sept.
R. O.
634. MONTEAGLE'S LANDS.
Value of the rents and farms of various places (named), 564l. 17s. 5½d.; profits of courts and casulaties, 6l. 17s. 10½d.
Fees and annuities to many persons:—to Ric. Bank, 6l. 12s. 8d.; to Laurence Starky, at Lancaster, 14s. Paid to lord Darcy, of the Martinmas rents of Brereley, 20l.; to Sir Ric. Ward, clk., 20l.; to Sir John Huse, at London, 133l. 6s. 8d.; to the same, at Hornby, 5 Sept., anno 16, 140l. 3s. 4d. Total, 374l. 18s. 11½d.
Remainder due, 196l. 16s. 4½d.
Paper roll, mutilated.
6 Sept.
Eras. Ep. p. 816. xviii. 51.
635. ERASMUS to HENRY VIII.
Was always conscious of his inability as a controversialist, but is encouraged by the King's example. His book De Libero Arbitrio is out. Expects to be stoned to death, but will console himself with the reflection that the King's Majesty is not spared in Germany, any more than Erasmus is. Had already resolved to do something for the Christian religion, but is the more incited to it by Henry's exhortation. Basle, 6 Sept. 1524.
Lat.
Cal. B. I. 34.
B. M.
636. PATRICK SINCLAIR to NORFOLK.
By desire of Carlisle herald, the bearer, advertises him of "the sodeours" about the King. Part are about the King, but the Queen did not think expedient to follow the directions given by Norfolk. After leaving the duke at Berwick, visited the Queen at Adynbrowth. She paid no attention to the Duke's memorial, desiring the King might remain in Edinburgh while the ambassadors entered England, or at Melrose for "stanschyng of slawchter," and then the Duke would meet the Queen where she pleased. Wished he had good men to place about the King to stop inconveniences. It will be said the Queen did nothing but by the counsel of England. Dreads the evils that will ensue when the King comes to his freedom. The bearer can tell him more. Begs he will tear up the letter.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: "To my lord duke of Norfolk."
[6 Sept.]
Cal. B. VI. 402. B. M. St. P. IV. 126.
637. QUEEN MARGARET to NORFOLK.
Patrick Sinclair has shown her a memorial in Norfolk's handwriting, but no letter and no answer to hers, soliciting his counsel how to conduct herself till she received answer from the King. Neither has Sinclair obtained the money granted by the King for the 200 men about her son's person. Wishes to know by the bearer what she is to do. It will not be costly to the King in the end. Fears Norfolk has been deluded by false informants. He ought to trust none but her. As to Norfolk's advice that certain lords be chosen to do justice, and others to be about the King, there are some appointed for the former purpose, but care must be taken about the latter. Is not well assured of any lords, except Arran, Maxwell, and their friends. Wonders at his advising that the bishop of St. Andrew's be sent in embassy to England. If he were at liberty, he would be more troublesome than ever. The money granted by the King has already done a great deal of good, though it is not a month since it began. Hopes therefore it will not so soon be dropped. Edinburgh, Tuesday. Signed.
P.S.—Hopes he will keep his promise about Angus, but hears the Earl has not yet gone up to court.
6 Sept.
R. O.
638. HENRY VIII. to the ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY.
Desiring him, at the sight of these, and the receipt of Sir Henry Wyat, to furnish the King with 1,000 marks for the war, seeing that the army under the Duke of Bourbon had not only entered France, but driven the enemy before them. The money is to be repaid out of the subsidy granted by the last Parliament, at the feast of the Purification next coming. Under the Privy Seal, Windsor, 6 Sept. 16 Hen. VIII.
ii. Copy of the receipt, dated 27 Oct. 16 Hen. VIII.
Pp. 3. Endd.
R. O.639. [The SUBSIDY.]
"... ssimo domino nostro Regi ... [c]lerum Cant. Provinicæ ... sequen."
[The first fifth of the subsidy] for which Wm. archbp. of Canterbury was taxed for his see, 242l. 2s. 3¾d., and 8l. 1s. 4d. allowed for collection; the second fifth, 244l. 2s. 3¾d. and 8l. 2s. 8d. allowed; which sums be paid to John Barrett and Wm. Potkyn for the King. The third fifth, 921l. 9s. 10d., and 8l. 7s. 4d. allowed; the fourth fifth, 228l. 5s. 3d. 1½q., and 7l. 12s. allowed; the fifth and last portion, 226l. 16s. 9d., and 7l. 10s. 8d. allowed; of which he has paid 16l. 8s. 7d. 1½q. to Potkyn, and asked to be allowed to retain the residue, 666l. 13s. 4d., for the 1,000 mks. he lent the King according to a privy seal dated 6 Sept. 16 Hen. VIII., and Wyatt's receipt dated 27 Oct.
Lat., p. 1, mutilated.
7 Sept.
R. O.
640. CLEMENT VII. to WOLSEY.
Against certain persons who pretended licence and dispensation from the Holy See for contracting and consummating marriage within the prohibited degrees. The Pope declares he will grant no such dispensation, but separate the parties, only granting absolution. Wolsey is to take care to have the premises published by means of all the bishops both in England and Ireland. Rome, 7 Sept. 1524, 1 pont.
Lat., vellum, mutilated. Add. Endd.
7 Sept.
R. O.
641. CLEMENT VII. to the ABP. OF ST. ANDREW'S.
Commanding him to publish certain bulls against persons contracting matrimony within the prohibited degrees. Rome, 7 Sept. 1524.
Lat. Add.
8 Sept.
Vit. B. VI. 197. B. M.
642. DON HUGO DE MONCADA to_
Desires to be commended to the Ambassador, who will think that this letter is for him. His Lordship can send the news by our Ambassador at Venice. Is grieved to hear of the loss of the ships, which must be a great loss to that city. Rejoices that the Emperor has allotted 20,000 ducats a month for a new fleet. His Lordship must find out the quality and number of the ships and guns, how long it must be victualled, when it will be ready, whether it will be advisable to join the Viceroy's fleet, and, if so, where and how the enemy can be most injured. Two things must be remembered: that the winter is approaching; and that all the ports from Civita Vecchia to Aigues Mortes are in the enemy's power. If the fleets are intended for defence, his Lordship will easily judge what they can do together. If for offence, to distract the enemy's forces, it should be done at a suitable time, that the season of the year may supply the want of harbours, as from April to October. His lordship should, however, consult those who are skilled in nautical matters, and send his intentions to Moncada, that what seems best may be done when the Viceroy comes. Will stay here till then, but is writing to the Emperor to say that he will leave immediately after. Sublaco (Subiaco), 8 Sept.
Lat., pp. 2, copy.
10 Sept.
R. O.
643. ROBERT AMADAS.
Indenture dated 10 Sept. 16 Hen. VIII., between Sir Brian Stapleton and Robt. Amadas, stating that a statute of staple, of the same date, binding Sir Brian in 500l., shall be void if Sir Brian pays yearly to Amadas 40l., or, in default, allows him to receive it from the revenues of the manor of Byngham, Notts, of which Hen. lord Scrope and Thos. Magnus are seised, and the manors of Bryan Askam and Rugford, York, of which Sir H. Wyott and Amadas are seised to certain uses, as appears by indentures between Sir Brian and Amadas.
Draft, p. 1. Endd. Corrected by Cromwell.
10 Sept.
Hall's Chron. p. 684.
644. HENRY VIII.
A circular to divers lord and gentlemen, to be ready with such power as they can make to assist the King, or his lieutenant, in the invasion of France. Dated 10 Sept.

Footnotes

1 "Ricardo Bero, abbati Glasconiensi."