Milan
1456

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1912

Pages

17-18

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Milan: 1456', Calendar of State Papers and Manuscripts in the Archives and Collections of Milan: 1385-1618 (1912), pp. 17-18. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=92244 Date accessed: 31 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

1456

1456.
June 19.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
24. Thomas Thebaldus de Bononia to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The king is three days' journey from here, and I think he will go further away, because news has come from England that they are at sea with a large force and power, have taken a port and landed, capturing some places, though they do not yet say what they are or how. The Duke of Lanzon, (fn. 1) who is said to have had dealings with them, has been taken by the king, and it is thought that other lords of this kingdom have also had a share in such dealings, such as the Duke of Burgundy, the Count of Armagnac, who is cousin to the Duke of Lanzon, and some others. It is remembered that the Duke of Burgundy is suspect to the king for many reasons, and chiefly for this cause the king has made so close a compact with the Duke of Savoy, who in the past has always been at one with the house of Burgundy. The king's forces have been drawn back more towards France, and have orders to be ready to take the field on the 8th of next month to go where they may be ordered.
Lyons on the Rhone, the 19th June, 1456.
[Italian.]
Dec. 7.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
25. Thomaso Theobaldus de Bononia to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The king took six days to give his answer to these ambassadors [of Burgundy]. It was very curt and concise. He first thanked the duke for the honour shown to his son, which he felt sure was done out of respect for himself, so he said. Accordingly people think that he knew nothing about the dauphin's going. With respect to his son going against the Turks, he said that he neither refused nor gave leave, but they must be careful to do what seemed most honourable and advantageous. He pointed out that every step and action taken by the dauphin would be attributed by everybody to the duke, since he had the dauphin in his house and controlled him; and he wishes to keep and guide him as he would wish his own son Monsignor de Zareloyse to be governed and guided.
With this reply the ambassadors will leave either to-day or to-morrow, perceiving that the king and all the Court are alarmed (sbayti) at these proceedings. Many already say freely that war is inevitable. I expressed the opinion, in speaking with some of them, that there was a danger of the duke and the dauphin coming to terms with the English. They answered that it would be no marvel if the king had already sent there, and the English would prefer an understanding with the king to one with Burgundy or the dauphin. It seems that the king is doubtful about what may happen, to wit that the duke and the dauphin may come to terms with the English. Accordingly I conclude, as every one else does, that they will have so much to do among themselves that they will forget other things further off.
I say so much to warn you that if they have not war among themselves, and France being at peace, those others will not be able to remain quiet, like well-fed horses. This is beyond a doubt, especially as they have been invited and summoned. Thus if your lordship sees fit, it might not be amiss, especially as we do not appear to have other intelligence from thence, to send to Burgundy to learn what is said and done, and if it is necessary to set anything on foot by indirect ways, because the troubles of others are vexations for us. I beg you to take this in good part.
Lyons on the Rhone, the 7th December, 1456.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 John V. de Bellême, Duke of Alençon.


<--Previous:
Milan:
1455
Next:-->
Milan:
1458