Milan
1465

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1912

Pages

115-117

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'Milan: 1465', Calendar of State Papers and Manuscripts in the Archives and Collections of Milan: 1385-1618 (1912), pp. 115-117. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=92252 Date accessed: 30 October 2014.


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1465

1465
Jan. 15.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
141. Albrico Malleta, Milanese Ambassador in France, to the Duke OF Milan.
I spoke to his Majesty as instructed about King Ferrando and the proposal he wished to make for the marriage of your daughter. His Majesty said you had acted very wisely in not allowing an ambassador to come from him as it would be too great a charge, but he left it to you to decide about sending to the King of England and the Duke of Burgundy, but if you sent he asked to be informed of what you would say. He did not seem displeased with anything that I said to him, but perhaps it would be as well to advise King Ferrando not to give the invitation to the King of England or the Duke of Burgundy, as it might easily generate suspicion and anger, and give others cause to speak evil. It would not do for him to appear more English or Burgundian than for his Majesty, whom I assured that whatever King Ferrando might do with the English he will always be the good son and good friend of his Majesty. I think that tins fully satisfied him.
Chinon, the 15th January, 1465.
[Italian.]
Feb. 6.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
142. Albrico Malleta, Milanese Ambassador in France, to the Duke of Milan.
The king told me he would pay 150,000 crowns for the dowry. He was most eager for the alliance and would consider the money well laid out. He would have done the same with King Edward if he had remained constant. He said a great deal on this subject.
Franceschino Nori told me that recently at table they told the king that King Ferrando had taken this device of the King of England (fn. 1) and this led to much comment. The king said he had not heard of it. Franceschino remarked that D. Albrico had told him he had advised his Majesty of this. The king said he remembered nothing about it. When I heard this I thought I would again tell him what your lordship wrote to me, and the reasons why he accepted that device. So I repeated to him what your lordship wrote, adding that at the time when King Ferrando accepted that device his Majesty considered King Edward his friend and proposed a marriage alliance with him, and this was only done by respect of King Henry and not to offend or injure his Majesty. The king replied that he remembered what I had said. If King Ferrando wished to injure him, he was very wrong. He wished no harm to M. de Milan, but King Ferrando being so intimate with him and accepting the device of those who were usually the enemies of the House of France showed that M. de Milan was not so devoted to him as he thought. I replied that at the time the device was sent to King Ferrando, King Edward was not reputed his Majesty's enemy, but a great friend. No understanding had been made through it. I finally succeeded in leaving him satisfied, but it cost me much trouble. I remember having advised against the acceptance of this device, and I think it will be better for King Ferrando not to invite the English to the marriage.
The Queen, wife of King Henry, has written to the king here that she is advised that King Edward and the Earl of Warwick have come to very great division and war together. She begs the king here to be pleased to give her help so that she may be able to recover her kingdom or at least allow her to receive assistance from the lords of this kingdom who are willing to afford this, and if he will not take any one of these courses, she writes that he will take the best course that she can. The king remarked, Look how proudly she writes (guarda como scrive costei superbamente). Your lordship will learn of English affairs better by way of Bruges than by this way.
Axeto, the 6th February, 1465.
[Italian.]
Feb. 11.
Registro
Missvi
Ducale.
Vol. 63.
Milan
Archives.
143. Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Edward IV, King of England.
Bartholomeo de Rivera, esquire and envoy of your Serenity, the bearer of these presents, came to us on his return from Naples, and imparted to us certain things about your Serenity's successes, and your good will and affection for us, as set forth in your letters of credence. We heard all this with great joy and gladness, and out of respect for your Majesty, we have embraced both Bartholomeo and all that he brought. In returning thanks to your Serenity for the things that Bartholomeo has set forth, we need not enter into a lengthy written explanation of the things which occur to us, as your Majesty may hear it from him, since we have fully made known our mind to him, and we beg you to give full confidence to what he relates.
Milan, the 11th February, 1465.
[Latin.]
Feb. 11.
Registro
Missivi
Ducale.
Vol. 63.
Milan
Archives.
144. Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Richard, Earl of Warwick.
We have made known our affection and esteem for you to Bartholomeo de Rivera, who is returning to England, who imparted certain matters to us under letters of credence from you. We have entrusted him with certain matters to impart to your lordship and we therefore beg you to give full confidence to what he says to you on our behalf.
Milan, as above.
[Latin.]
Nov. 15.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
145. Giovanni Pietro Panigarola, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
As Christoforo says that your Excellency was advised previously by me about the King of Scotland, I say that that king sent an ambassador to his Majesty to ask the reason of the war, making the demand in favour of the Duke of Burgundy. I hear that his Majesty replied that it was not against him. I afterwards heard that if matters had gone more quickly it would probably have rather favoured his Majesty than otherwise; and the ambassador went to Rome to get absolution for Duke Sigismund of Austria, excommunicated by the late Pope Pius.
Melun, ten leagues from Paris, the 15th November, 1465.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Ferdinand I, King of Naples, succeeded to the stall of Sir John Fastolf as a Knight of the Garter. The habit of the Garter was sent to him by Berthelot de Ryvers on the 16th July, 1463, though he was not installed until the 7th year of Edward IV. Anstis: Order of the Garter, i, page 49.

Annotations

70 jacob.ellis - (Tuesday 31 Mar 2009 12:18:35)
Entry number 142, for "that he will" read "for she will".
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