Rome
1560

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Institute of Historical Research

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J. M. Rigg (editor)

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1916

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16-29

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'Rome: 1560', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Vatican Archives, Volume 1: 1558-1571 (1916), pp. 16-29. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=92525 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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1560.

1560.
Vat. Arch.
Conc. di
Trento.
Arm. lxiii.
vol. 147,
finem versus.
29. Divers Sects of Lutherans.
Under this heading are indiscriminately included the true followers of Luther, the Antinomians, the Zuinglians, the Anabaptists and other sectaries, who had little in common with the Lutherans.
[1560.] Latin.
Vat. Arch.
Arm. lxviii.
Pii. IV. Epp. ad
Princ.
vol. i. f. 29.
Vat. Lib.
Barb. Lat.
2125 (xxxi.
10). f. 9d.
30. Pope Pius IV to Mary, Queen of the French.
Expressing his regret at parting with her uncle Louis, Cardinal of Guise, which, however, is mitigated by his sense that the Cardinal's authority will still ‘istic quoque’ be used to further the Pope's intentions.
24 Jan., 1560. Rome. Latin. Copies.
Vat. Arch.
Arm. lxviii.
Pii. IV. Epp. ad.
Princ.
vol. i. f. 227.
Vat. Lib.
Barb. Lat.
2125 (xxxi. 10).
f. 15d.
31. The Same to Alvaro de la Quadra, Bishop of Aquila, Ambassador of the Catholic King in England.
From your letters to Francis Vargas, King Philip's ambassador to Us, as well as from his long and studied discourse We have heard with pleasure of your piety and zealous efforts to confirm those that adhere to the Catholic religion, and to reclaim those that the enemy has led astray. We heartily commend your diligence and holy zeal, and pray you to persevere in this work so worthy of your office and yourself, for which God will reward you.
2 March, 1560. Rome. Latin. Copies.
Vat. Lib.
Urb. Lat.
1039. f. 142.
32. News Letter.
“It is reported from the French Court that M. d'Aumale (fn. 1) will shortly go to Scotland with 10,000 foot.
“It since appears that the Duke has gone to visit Metz, Toul, and Verdun, to take measures for fortifying them, whence it would seem that there is no intention of restoring them to the Emperor, as requested by the Imperial ambassadors.”
18 March, 1560. Milan. Italian. Copy.
Vat. Lib.
Urb. Lat.
1039. f. 148.
33. News Letter.
“The Imperial ambassador, who came here to pay his compliments and reverence to the King and Queen, seems now to be treating of other matters of much importance.
“Lord Montague (fn. 2) and Thomas Chamberlain, the English ambassadors, have come to congratulate the King on the Queen's arrival, and to inform their Majesties of the reason that induces their Queen to make war upon the French, and to beg his Majesty to stand neutral and to abide by the treaties.”
28 March, 1560. Toledo. Italian. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Arm. lxviii.
Pii IV. Epp. ad
Princ.
vol. i. f. 160.
Vat. Lib.
Barb. lat.
2125 (xxxi. 10).
f. 22d.
34. Pope Pius IV to Mary, Queen of the French.
Announcing that Sebastian [Gualtieri], Bishop of Viterbo, who is sent as Nuncio to the Most Christian King, is also charged with message to the Queen, which message he will deliver by word of mouth.
29 March, 1560. Rome. Latin. Copies.
Vat. Lib.
Vat. Lat.
6436.
f. 238.
35. News Letter. (fn. 3)
“His Catholic Majesty has recovered completely, thanks be to God.
“On the 30th of last month the English ambassadors had an audience of his Majesty, which was of the briefest, and, it is said, little to his Majesty's satisfaction. They sought to induce his Majesty to persuade the King of France to pardon the Scottish rebels and Lutherans, to withdraw his army from Scotland, and to give respite to these miscreants, and also to restore Calais. Whereto his Majesty made no other answer than that he referred them to the Duke of Alva, from whom they would learn his mind. (fn. 4) It is common knowledge at Court that he will do nothing in this business, but that he would very gladly see the Queen of England give up the protectorate which she has assumed of the Scots, and, that, if she will not do so, he will aid the Most Christian King with all his might at his own expense.”
7 April, [1560]. The Catholic Court, Toledo. Italian. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Varia Polit.
Arm. ii.
vol. 14.
ff. 263–67d.
36. [Octavian Rovere,] Bishop of Terracina, Nuncio in Spain to Spain to [Charles Borromeo, Cardinal Archbishop of Milan].
“In the second audience the King alleged, as his excuse for not having come to a decision on the matters proposed, the grave affairs that had supervened, to wit, the war that had broken out between the Queens of England and Scotland, which latter country the French had taken under their protection, the result being that both sides sought his Majesty's aid, England relying upon the capitulations by which his Majesty was bound to aid her in such wars, (fn. 5) France alleging that her protectorate of Scotland and the war were for the defence of the Catholic religion, which the Queen of England was minded to extinguish in that kingdom, and therefore encouraged the heretics and raised the people in rebellion against their Queen, so that it was meet the Catholic King should support so holy a cause. Besides which, it was said that religious strife had been stirred up in France itself, and that there were rebellions in Provence, and other parts of the kingdom, which his Majesty was asked to help in suppressing. As to the war between France and England, his Majesty announced his intention of remaining neutral, and as their common friend tendering his good offices as mediator; but as against the heretic rebels he pledged himself to France with all his forces to the day of his death.
“As touching the assessor, (fn. 6) it was intimated to the nuncio by a doctor of the Council that the assessor was intended to enhance the dignity and jurisdiction of the Apostolic See, and so the appointment must needs be by bull of his Holiness that it might have his Holiness' sanction, and in the meanwhile the Council was content that the nuncio should exercise his faculties without an assessor. The nuncio in the course of the discussion said that if nuncios scandalously abused their faculties, the practice of granting them faculties should be discontinued. To which the answer was in the negative for two reasons; 1, because in that case plans would have to await ratification, and in the meanwhile would miscarry, besides other inconveniences; and so they must needs have faculties; 2, because to save expense recourse would be had to the ordinaries.”
7 April, 1560. [Toledo.] Italian.
“It was resolved to send Don Garcia Lasso della Vega to France to negotiate peace between France and England. The question of the faculties was left in abeyance pending the decision of the Pope.”
12 April, 1560. [Toledo.] Italian.
“Garcia Lasso departed for France to negotiate peace between France and England.”
25 April, 1560. [Toledo.] Italian. (fn. 7)
Vat. Lib.
Urb. Lat.
1039.
f 154.
37. News Letter.
“The Catholic King gave audience to the English ambassadors, and to their demands made answer that, if their Queen should make war upon the King of France, he will show himself her enemy. He also said that he had given the King of France to understand that, if he should make war upon the English, he will bear himself in like manner towards him; for he would have the peace now concluded and the articles thereof to be strictly observed. Wherefore the said ambassadors sent forthwith a messenger to inform their Queen; nor have they since quitted their lodging.
“The Duchess of Alva has sent a courier to Rome with most beautiful presents for the Pope.
“Garzilasso della Vega, who is to go to France to consult about the league which the Protestants are said to have made in favour of England, and to offer aid in money and men to the King of France, will depart shortly. They say that the marriage of Don Cesare Gonzaga does not give much satisfaction in that Court.”
15 April, 1560. Toledo. Italian, Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Arm. lxviii.
Pii IV. Epp. ad
Princ. vol. i.
f. 282.
38. Pope Pius IV to Catherine [de' Medici], the Most Christian Queen Dowager of the French.
Introducing his nephew, Gabriel ab Emps, (fn. 8) who is charged with a message to the Queen which he will deliver by word of mouth.
21 April, 1560. Rome. Latin. Copy.
Vat. Lib.
Urb. Lat.
1039.
f. 150d.
39. News Letter.
“The Pope, having watched for some time the course of events in England with a view to finding means to bring that realm back to the Catholic religion, is now apprised that the English Catholics will persist in their opinion not without hope that the Queen may yet be willing to listen to proposals for the reconciliation of herself and her kingdom to the Holy See. The Pope, therefore, yesterday determined to send an envoy to the Queen to sound her disposition in regard to the said matter, and has chosen the Abbot of San Saluto (fn. 9) for the purpose, though it is not yet known when he will depart.”
27 April, 1560. Rome. Italian. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Arm. xliv.
vol. 10. f. 5d. Vat. Lib.
Barb. Lat.
2125 (xxxi. 10).
f. 33.
40. Answer of Pope Pius IV given in Public Consistory to the Ambassador of the King of the French and the Queen of Scotland.
“The Pope graciously receives their Majesties' assurance of obedience, prays for the peace and weal of their realms, with increase of Divine grace, and promises them and the Queen Mother all his good offices.
“As to the Church he is resolved to continue the work, to which he has already addressed himself, of restoring its ancient dignity and peace by reforming the morals and discipline of the priesthood and purging it of heresy and schism. He therefore purposes to summon a General Council, and as this is in accordance with the Most Christian King's desire, he counts upon his aid in furtherance of so pious and salutary an intention.”
May, 1560. Rome. Latin. Copies.
Vat. Arch.
Nunt. Germ.
vol. iv. f. 11d.
41. [Charles] Borromeo, Cardinal [Archbishop of Milan] to [Octavian Rovere,] Bishop of Terracina, Nuncio [in Spain].
“It was already understood that the negotiation for the English match, (fn. 10) was broken off, but it was a satisfaction to his Holiness to receive confirmation of the report from his Majesty's own mouth.
“As to the other match, (fn. 11) you have shown prudence by following the instructions of the ambassador of Florence, and it will be well for you so to act in the future, doing neither more nor less than he would have you do.”
1 May, 1560. [Rome.] Italian. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Nunt. Germ.
vol. lxiv.
f. 123.
42. Stanislaus [Hosius], Bishop of Ermland to Charles Borromeo, Cardinal Archbishop of Milan.
Complaining that he is a nuncio without instructions, without faculties, without money. In accordance, however, with the Pope's verbal instructions, he has already transacted the most urgent business with the Emperor and the King of Bohemia. But as to the Council and as to the proposed match between the Archduke Charles and the Queen of England he has kept silence, for it is uncertain when the Council will assemble, and whether the match will ever come about. Indeed, the Queen of England's ambassador has now taken his leave. The match might, perhaps, yet be arranged if it be true, as reported, that the Queen has a secretary at Rome by whom she craves reception into the Catholic Church, and offers forthwith to return to the obedience of the Apostolic See. But the Emperor himself has said that there is at present no hope of the match.
2 May, 1560. Vienna. Latin.
Vat. Arch.
Nunt. Germ.
vol. iv.
f. 13d.
43. [Charles Borromeo, Cardinal Archbishop of Milan] to [Octavian Rovere,] Bishop of Terracina, Nuncio [in Spain].
“You must know that the Pope has resolved to send a nuncio to the Queen of England, to try to bring her back to the bosom of the Church and the obedience of the Holy See; for the garboils in which the Queen at present finds herself afford him hope that the enterprise may be honoured by success. For this purpose his Holiness has selected Abbot Parpaglia, whom he has already furnished with money for the journey; and so instant is he with him that I think he will start to-morrow.
“His instructions are to travel through France, and do all that may be in his power to procure from their Majesties all such assistance as he may deem most serviceable in the affair.
“In Flanders he will address himself in like manner to Madam the Governess. And we here shall also do our endeavour with the Emperor to induce him to aid so holy an enterprise.
“It only remains to enlist the support of his Catholic Majesty, to which end his Holiness himself has spoken to the Ambassador Vargas, that he may write to his Majesty. He has also decided that you be written to, that you may inform his Majesty of the matter, and pray him to direct his ambassador resident in England, and Madam the Governess and his other ministers in Flanders to do their utmost in aid of the said enterprise. You will therefore not fail to use all due diligence to secure, alike in England and in Flanders, as prompt and energetic action as possible in furtherance of the Pope's most holy intention in this matter.”
4 May, 1560. [Rome.] Italian. Copy.
Vat, Arch.
Arm. lxviii
Pii IV. Epp. ad.
Princ. vol. i.
f. 324.
Vat. Lib.
Barb. Lat.
2125 (xxxi. 10)
f. 30.
44. Pope Pius IV to King Ferdinand, Emperor Elect of the Romans.
Having some hope of recalling the Queen and people of England to the unity of the Catholic Church, We have sent to her Vincent Parpaglia, Abbot of S. Solutor (sic), (fn. 12) a man of proved ability, and by his knowledge of men and affairs well fitted for such a task. We now crave of your Majesty that you will be pleased to lend Us your aid and to use all your influence by letters and nuncios to induce the Queen to listen to our counsels, and return to the unity of the Catholic Church. We have already touched on this matter in converse with your ambassador here; but our policy will be more fully expounded by our nuncio, Stanislaus, Bishop of Ermland.
5 May, 1560. Rome. Latin. Copies.
Ut supra.
ff. 336 and 29d.
45. The Same to Phillip II, King of Spain.
Apprising him of the despatch of a nuncio to England, upon the errand described in the preceding letter, and exhorting him to lend his support to so pious and (for the King), by reason of the proximity of the Netherlands to England, so politic an enterprise.
5 May, 1560. Rome. Latin. Copies.
Ut supra.
ff. 330 and 30d.
46. The Same to Elizabeth, Queen of England.
Accrediting Abbot Parpaglia as nuncio.
5 May, 1560. Rome. Latin. Copies.
Printed
in Camden, Annales, (1615), pp. 58–9; and Raynaldus, Annales, vol. xv. § 42. For translation see History of England,, ed. Kennet, 1706, vol. ii. p. 384, and Dodd, Church History of England, ed. Tierney, vol. ii. App. no. xlvii.
Vat. Arch.
Arm. xliv.
vol. 10.
f. 182d.
no. 228.
47. The Same to Margaret of Austria, Governess of the Netherlands.
Apprising her of Abbot Parpaglia's mission to England, and that he is bidden to communicate the whole matter to her. The Pope counts upon her aid in furtherance of the enterprise, more especially as thereby she will greatly gratify her brother the King of Spain. She is to trust the abbot as she would the Pope himself.
7 May, 1560. Rome. Latin. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Arm. lxviii.
Pii IV. Epp. ad
Princ.
vol. i. f. 334.
Vat. Lib.
Barb. Lat.
2125 (xxxi. 10).
f. 31.
48. Pope Pius IV to Antony [Perrenot de Granvelle], Bishop of Arras.
Apprising him of the mission of Abbot Parpaglia, to whom he is referred for further information. The Pope counts upon the good offices of Margaret of Austria, Governess of the Netherlands, and the bishop and his colleagues of the Royal Council in furtherance of the enterprise.
8 May, 1560. Rome. Latin. Copies.
Vat. Arch.
Arm. lxviii.
Pii IV. Epp. ad
Princ.
vol. i. f. 328.
Arm. xliv.
vol. 10.
f. 170.
no. 213.
49. The Same to Elizabeth, Queen of England.
Second brief soliciting a favourable hearing for Abbot Parpaglia.
8 May 1560. Rome. Latin. Copies.
Vat. Lib.
Urb. Lat.
1039. f. 157.
50. News Letter.
… “The Abbot of San Saluto, who was to go as nuncio to England, has not yet departed, and it is thought that he is not to go after all, by reason of certain bad offices done him by the Ambassador Vargas, who has represented to his Holiness that he is not fit for such a mission.”
11 May, 1560. Rome. Italian. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Varia Polit.
Arm. ii.
vol. 117.
f. 374d.
51. Instructions to Sebastian [Gualtieri], Bishop of Viterbo, Nuncio in France.
“As to Scottish affairs you may do whatever shall seem to you meet to evince his Holiness' concern in regard to the trouble and annoyance which they occasion his Most Christian Majesty; but you are not to involve his Holiness in any engagement to succour him at his Holiness' own cost, more especially because that kingdom is not declared to be schismatic, so that his Holiness has no cause to move. Besides which it is no slight matter that his Holiness should offer his aid in Genevan affairs, as he has already done, of which you will be able to make much.”
15 May, 1560. [Rome.] Italian. Copy. (fn. 13)
Vat. Lib.
Urb. Lat.
1039. f. 159.
52. News Letters.
… “It is not yet decided who is to go to England as nuncio in place of the Abbot of San Saluto, who, some think, may after all be sent, as the Pope does not consider the objections of Vargas sufficient to prove his unfitness for the mission.”
17 and 21 May, 1560. Rome. Italian. Copies.
1560.
Vat. Arch.
Arm. lxiv.
vol. 28.
f. 289.
53. Recent Intelligence from England.
“The assault upon Leith in Scotland has so slackened that hope of taking the town is almost abandoned. The walls had been so shattered by the artillery that a breach by which it was thought the town might be entered had been made when new fortifications, no less strong than those which had been demolished, again debarred the besiegers from access.
“We need reinforcements to the number of a thousand or more. Moreover, our treaty with the Scots has now almost elapsed, so that henceforth very few, at most six hundred, Scots will co-operate with us in the siege.
“At home, meanwhile, severe measures have been taken against the Catholics. The Bishop of Chester [Cuthbert Scott], and some deans and other priests of no mean reputation, have been thrown into prison upon the same charge for which the Bishop of London [Edmund Bonner] was recently imprisoned. The Bishop of Lincoln [Thomas Watson], the Abbot of Westminster [John de Feckenham] and [John] Story, D.C.L., appeared before the judges on the same charge, with what result is not yet known.
“An immense fleet composed of ships gathered from all parts, besides foreign merchant ships, Flemish and others, that were in our ports is reported as about to be sent to sea: we have not seen the like these forty years past.
“The Queen has sent agents to Germany, according to some, to borrow money, or, as others conjecture, to treat of some affairs with divers princes: however this may be, our merchants are with all speed returning thence with their goods.”
[c. May 20, 1560.] Latin. Copy. Cf. Strype, Annals (8o), I. i. p. 220.
Vat. Arch.
Nunt. Germ.
vol. lxiv.
f. 138d.
54. Stanislaus [Hosius], Bishop of Ermland to Charles Borromeo, Cardinal [Archbishop of Milan].
“Unless I am mistaken, the Emperor mentioned the proposed match with the Queen of England in the very first audience that I had of him, saying that kings and great princes had sought his daughters in marriage, but as they were heretics, he had utterly rejected their alliance. ‘Nor,’ said he, ‘would I suffer the Queen of England, however much she might desire it, to wed my son until she had returned to the Catholic faith and the obedience of the Holy Apostolic See.’
“Whereupon I said that I had instructions to lay before his Majesty about that very matter; but as the audience had been a long one, and night drew near, I would produce them on another occasion.
“And so on 3 June I broached this matter touching the Queen with his Majesty in the very terms used by his Holiness, as you bade me. And he replied that he had long ago given up all idea of that marriage, and had recalled the envoy that he had had at the Queen's court, and was in hourly expectation of his return. And so, having no ambassador there, he could send him on commands either as to that or any other of the matters which I had broached.”
5 June, 1560. Vienna. Latin. Copy. (fn. 14)
Vat. Arch.
Arm. lxiv.
vol. 28.
f. 64.
55. Emperor Ferdinand I to Elizabeth, Queen of England.
Desiring her to accord a favourable reception to the nuncio whom the Pope is about to send to her, and to be guided by his counsel.
20 June, 1560. Vienna. Latin. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Nunt. Germ.
vol. iv. f. 32.
56. [Charles Borromeo, Cardinal Archbishop of Milan] to [Octavian Rovere, ] Bishop of Terracina, Nuncio in Spain.
“As to Abbot Parpaglia the Pope has taken his Majesty's observations in good part, and has forthwith sent word to the Abbot that, if he have not already crossed to England, he must await further orders; and if he have made the passage, he is to enter upon no negotiation without the participation, consent and approval of his Catholic Majesty's ambassador in that kingdom.”
29 June, 1560. [Rome.] Italian. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Varia Polit.
Arm. ii.
vol. 45. f. 318.
57. Capitulation between the French and the English.
“The terms arranged are as follows:—
“The soldiers at present in Pitilie [Petit Leith] shall, as soon as the capitulation is published, evacuate the place, and the Queen of England shall permit those of the highest rank and consequence to pass through her kingdom on their way to France, and shall furnish all the rest with ships to cross the sea, the French deputies being bound to give hostages to the English that the ships so lent them shall be returned in the same condition as when lent.
“Pitilie [Petit Leith] shall be forthwith dismantled in such sort as may satisfy captains nominated by the English deputies that it cannot be refortified.
“Dunbar and l'Isola di Cavalli (fn. 15) [Inchkeith] shall be left in the same condition as at present, and neither fortress shall be garrisoned by more than sixty French soldiers, with their officers, who shall be in the pay of the Scots.
“All the fortresses and forts that are being built in Scotland shall be razed at the same time and on the same terms as Pitilie [Petit Leith].
“The government of Scotland shall henceforth be ordered as follows: that is to say, the three estates of the realm, to wit, the clergy, the nobles, and the people, shall forthwith elect twenty-four of their number, being Scotsmen born; and of that body there shall be chosen twelve, of whom seven shall be nominated by the Most Christian King and Queen, and the other five by the estates, to have charge of the government of the realm for their lives (upon the death of each of them a successor being elected in the same way); and in them jointly shall be vested the government royal authority and all the power of the state.
“The Scots shall be at liberty to live in the practice of their religion exempt from all censure.
“All the rebels that from 1558 to the present time have renounced their allegiance to the Most Christian King and Queen shall be reinstated in their property, offices, rank and all else that they possessed before the rebellion, and shall be received as loyal vassals of their Majesties.
“For the future the Most Christian King and Queen shall not use the title of King of England either in letters or in writings or in public acts. Instruments and other writings heretofore made shall be annulled and accounted as of no force or effect until they shall have been rectified in style accordingly. The same change shall be made in all places where the arms of England are painted, or engraved, quartered with those of their Majesties; and no such quartering shall be practised for the future in any place upon any occasion.
“The capitulation shall be subscribed by the Most Christian King and Queen, the Queen of England, and the Parliament of Scotland; and in case their Majesties should make default in regard to any article thereof affecting the Scots, the Queen of England may then undertake their protection for the purpose of enforcing the observance of the capitulation.
“By letter from France, dated 15 July, 1560.” Italian. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Arm. xlii.
vol. 14.
f. 175.
58. Pope Pius IV to David Wolf, S.J.
Commission appointing him visitor as well of regulars as of seculars in Ireland with ample faculties for absolving all persons of either sex in all cases, including even those reserved for the Apostolic See and comprised in the bull Coena Domini, (fn. 16) and especially cases of heresy and schism: also faculties for commuting vows, except those of religion and chastity, and granting dispensations in cases of marriage within the prohibited degrees of consanguinity and affinity, the first and second degrees excepted, and in other cases, except wilful homicide, bigamy and mutilation.
He is also empowered to furnish those who come to Rome seeking promotion to sees and the greater benefices with letters testimonial, without which they will return re infecta.
2 August, 1560. Rome. Latin. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Nunt. Germ.
vol. iv. f. 75.
59. [Charles Borromeo, Cardinal Archbishop of Milan] to [Octavian Rovere,] Bishop of Terracina, Nuncio in Spain.
“As the courier that should have left three days ago is still here, his Holiness has bidden me to add this letter, to let you know that in view of the enclosed list of prelates and other people of quality either imprisoned or banished by the Queen of England for being good, faithful and true Catholics, his Holiness desires you to be instant with his Majesty that he do his zealous endeavour with the said Queen to obtain the liberation of these poor prisoners; and as to the exiles, as they are for the most part, if not all, in Flanders, that he furnish them with the means of subsistence, which should take the form of a pension for life upon the benefices of Flanders or Spain, as may best suit his Majesty. Pending such better provision by his Majesty, his Holiness is supplying them with ready money for their immediate needs.
“You will not fail to do your office with zeal according to his Holiness' intention.”
19 August, 1560. [Rome.] Italian. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Nunt. Divers.
vol. cvii.
ff. 174d.–176.
60. [Prospero Publicola Santacroce, Bishop of Chissamos,] Nuncio in Spain to [Charles] Borromeo, Cardinal [Archbishop of Milan].
… “I took occasion to speak to his Majesty as to the mission of the Abbot of San Saluto to England, how his Holiness in his zeal to do all that belongs to his office for the service of God had despatched this gentleman, accounting the affront which he might receive as nought or rather in the circumstances as a glory, and, understanding that such was his Majesty's advice, had directed that it should be patiently borne.
“His Majesty told me that he, on his part, thanked his Holiness very heartily, and besought him to go no further in this business, because his Majesty was taking steps which might some time or another have some good result; but for the present he only bade me to write to this effect to his Holiness, and that his Majesty would lose no time, and would let his Holiness know all when it should be ripe for disclosure.”
5 September, 1560. Toledo. Italian. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Nunt. Germ.
vol. iv. f. 40d.
61. [Charles Borromeo, Cardinal Archbishop of Milan] to [Octavian Rovere,] Bishop of Terracina, and [Prospero Publicola] Santacroce, Bishop of Chissamos, Nuncios in Spain.
“Seeing that the Nuncio that was to cross to England has found the sea more troublesome than was expected, by reason of the Queen's obstinate refusal to suffer him to make the passage, his Holiness has sent him word that he had better return hither. Nevertheless you should be all the more urgent with his Majesty on behalf of those poor bishops and other English Catholics who are in prison or in exile, that the former may by his good offices be discharged, and the latter furnished with the means of subsistence.”
17 September, 1560. [Rome.] Italian. Copy.
Vat. Arch.
Nunt. Divers.
vol. cvii. f. 66d.
Nunt. Germ.
vol. iv. f. 48.
62. [Charles] Borromeo, Cardinal [Archbishop of Milan] to [Prospero Publicola] Santacroce, Bishop [of Chissamos], Nuncio in Spain.
“It is with the utmost satisfaction that the Pope learns that his Majesty has still hope of some success in the English business, and therefore keeps the negotiation afoot. And so, to aid and second his Majesty's policy, his Holiness has recalled his nuncio, the Abbot of San Saluto, and leaves for the present the management of the whole affair in his Majesty's hands, ceasing not to pray God to honour his endeavours with a happy issue.”
5 Oct., 1560. Rome. Italian. Copy.
Vat. Lib.
Vat. Lat.
6409. f. 58.
63. Vincent Parpaglia, [Abbot of S. Solutor] to [John,] Cardinal Moroni.
“To-day, no sooner, I received your letters of 3 Sept., and likewise have got the bill of exchange for the 500 crowns for distribution among the poor English that are in these parts; but zeal for the Catholic religion moves me to have most regard to the sister of the Bishop of Rochester [Fisher], (fn. 17) who is in Zealand in a very poor monastery in an insalubrious place; and though I have recently conveyed to her my desire that she should leave it and come hither, she would not do so, being resolved not to desert eight other English nuns that accompanied her thither; and although the Catholic King has assigned to each of them an allowance of 20 crowns yearly, yet they get payment only with difficulty, if not great delay, by reason of the scarcity of money, as it was necessary to provide for the pay of 3,000 disbanded Spanish soldiers. So this little subvention that will be sent to the monastery will be very timely.
“In the distribution of the 500 crowns I deem that I must be guided by Mr. Maurice, an English doctor that is here with me, and also by an English dean, a very worthy man, who is at Louvain, whence I will summon him hither. I therefore cannot at present account to you for the disbursement of the money, but I will do so fully in subsequent letters.
“By a letter of Mgr. Borromeo written by the Pope's direction under date 21 Sept. I am informed that I am to return to Rome. I expect to be able to start on the 22nd instant. I shall post by way of France, and shall get speech of the Constable and the Cardinal of Lorraine, so as to learn as exactly as I may the condition of things in that kingdom. I shall likewise seek out Cardinal de Tournon (fn. 18) for the same purpose, and also to discover how matters stand on the side of Avignon, so that on my return to Rome my journey may not seem to have been altogether superfluous and futile, because I have been unable to do any good here. And if on my arrival in Italy, which may well be on 20 Nov., I shall hear that you are still in Lombardy, I shall seek you out also, as duty bids and desire prompts me.
“It remains but to say, as regards the bishops and others that are in prison in England, that I have always kept them apprised of how much the Pope has their liberation at heart, and how unremitting are the endeavours that are made for their assistance, and how zealous you are to promote their interest with his Holiness and all the princes that have the ear of that Queen; whereby they have been much comforted. Nor shall I fail to let them know that his Holiness has recalled me because my presence here was deemed rather prejudicial than conducive to their liberation, but that from Rome the same diligence will be used as if I had been here; and I shall do my best to leave them in good heart, for I would not that by my departure they should lose all hope of liberation; nor can I believe that God would sustain their constancy to the true religion, unless He were minded to make thereby some notable example to Christendom.”
The letter concludes with complimentary messages from the Bishop of Arras and Margaret of Parma, “who has always deemed that Moroni and Pole were placed by God in the Sacred College in order that they might comfort His people by restoring the Christian religion, the hope of which restoration since Pole's decease rests in Moroni alone.”
13 Oct., 1560. Brussels. Italian. Holograph.
Vat. Arch.
Arm. lxviii.
Pii IV. Epp. ad
Princ. vol. i.
f. 584.
Vat. Lib.
Barb. Lat.
2125 (xxxi. 10). f. 57d.
64. Pope Pius IV to Mary, Queen Dowager of the French the younger.
Condoling with her on the death of her husband (fn. 19) and referring her to his nuncio Laurence [Lenzi], Bishop of Fermo for fuller expression of his sympathy.
18 Dec., 1560. Rome. Latin. Copies.
Vat. Arch.
Varia Polit.
Arm. ii. vol. 116
(Misc. Arm. ii. 177). f. 385d.
65. Instruction to [Philip Gheri,] Bishop of Ischia, Nuncio to Spain.
“As it will be necessary also to send an envoy to the Queen of England to intimate the Council and invite her thereto, it is desired that his [Catholic] Majesty should advise and support us as becomes a good Catholic prince and one better informed as to the affairs of that realm than the Pope can be. And that he may be the better able to further the negotiation with the Queen of England by his counsel, it is well that he should know that the Cardinal of Lorraine has given his Holiness to understand through his nuncio resident in France that the Crown of France would promise the Queen of England nevermore to vex her kingdom if she will submit to the Council; and though French affairs may assume another complexion by reason of the King's death, yet his Holiness desires that his Catholic Majesty should be apprised of this particular, that he may found thereon such action as, considering the nature of the persons and the course of events he may deem expedient. But fail not to give him to understand that the Cardinal of Lorraine might have done this office rather to incense his Holiness against the Queen than in sincerity of mind. In no case would his Holiness do aught in this matter without first communicating with his Catholic Majesty.”
[Dec., 1560. Rome.] Italian. Draft. (fn. 20)

Footnotes

1 Claude, Duke of Aumale, third son of Claude, first Duke of Guise.
2 Anthony Browne, Viscount Montague.
3 Printed by Pollen, S.J., ut supra, p. 44. Cf. Cal. State Papers, Venetian, 1558–80, pp. 178, 186: Cal. State Papers, Spanish, 1558–67, pp. 136 et seq.
4 Cf. Cal. State Papers, Foreign, 1559–60, p. 528n.
5 The Treaty of Cateau Cambrésis contains no clause expressly binding Spain to aid England by force of arms in such a case. Cf. Cal. State Papers, Foreign, 1558–9, p. 195.
6 It was proposed to associate with the nuncio an assessor by way of security against abuse of jurisdiction.
7 Printed in part by Pollen, S.J., ut supra, p. 43.
8 Probably younger son of Wolfgang Dietrich, Count of Hohenems (Altemps) by the Pope's sister Clara, and younger brother of Marcus Sittich, Count of Hohenems, Bishop of Constance, created Cardinal in 1561.
9 Cf. footnote on p. 21 infra.
10 The match proposed with the Archduke Charles. Cf. Cal. State Papers, Venetian, 1558–80, p. 196.
11 The match proposed between Philip II's sister Joanna, widow of John, Infant of Portugal, and Francis, eldest son of Cosimo de' Medici, Duke of Florence. Cf. Cal. State Papers, Venetian, 1558–80, p. 285; and Cal. State Papers, Foreign, 1560–1, p. 453.
12 As to this saint, whose name is frequently corrupted into Saluto, see Ughelli, Italia Sacra, vol. iv. p. 1422.
13 Printed by Pollen, S.J., ut supra, pp. 45–6.
14 Printed in Nuntiaturberichte, 1560–62, ed. Steinherz, 1897, p. 41.
15 Cf. Cal. State Papers, Scotland, 1547–63, pp. 206, 481–2.
16 For this bull, which derived its title from the practice, usually dated from the pontificate of Martin V. of reading it on Holy Thursday in the presence of the Pope, the Sacred College, and the Roman Court, see P. Rebuffi, Praxis Beneficiorum, Lyon, 1586; Paris, 1664, 1674. Cf. Bullar. Roman. Index, Casus Reservati.
17 C. p. 66, infra.
18 Bishop of Ostia and Archbishop of Lyon.
19 Francis II died 5 Dec., 1560.
20 Printed in Papal Negotiations with Mary Queen of Scots (Scott, Hist. Soc., 1901), ed. J. H. Pollen, S.J., p. 50.


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