Regesta 133
1338

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. H. Bliss (editor)

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1895

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567-572

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'Regesta 133: 1338', Calendar of Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 2: 1305-1342 (1895), pp. 567-572. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=96142 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Regesta, Vol. CXXXIII.

4 Benedict XII. (fn. 1)

1338.
2 Non. June.
Avignon.
(f. 37.)
To Philip, king of France. The pope has received his letters touching the safe conduct given at the request of the cardinals Peter and Bertrand, papal nuncios, to the envoys of king Edward of England, who are about to come to treat of peace between him and the said king; and also touching what Lewis of Bavaria has written to the bishop of Liége. The pope approves the form in which the safe conduct has been given, and trusts that the treaty of peace will proceed prosperously. As to the letters of Lewis, the pope will write to the bishop of Liége.
9 Kal. Aug.
Avignon.
(f. 73d.)
To Peter, cardinal of St. Praxed's, and Bertrand, cardinal of St. Mary's in Aquiro, papal nuncios. Although the pope wrote to them to return to France, and to inform him as soon as they had crossed the sea, intimating to them to cease their negotiations until he wrote again, now that he has heard from them, of their return, and of the passage of king Edward's envoys to France, he orders them to continue their misssion with prudence and diligence, and to keep him informed of its progress.
Ibid.
(f. 74.)
To cardinal Bertrand. The pope has received his letters, and commends his diligence. As to the matter of Robert, about which the cardinal has written, the pope does not wish him to go deeply into an odious and dangerous business, but desires him to write touching this and other matters.
1338.
2 Kal. Aug.
Avignon.
(f. 75d.)
To Master Bernard de Sistre, archdeacon of Canterbury, papal nuncio. The pope has found in the register of John XXII. certain letters addressed to Itherius de Concoreto, canon of Salisbury, from which is quoted the passage touching the ancient taxation for the tenth of churches and benefices in the cities and dioceses of Durham and Carlisle, which together with that of a certain part of the diocese of York, was taxed anew to the amount of 2000l. lessening the ancient taxation, both the then and present kings receiving the tenth granted by the pope, according to the new taxation, without difficulty. Pope John, having imposed a tenth of ecclesiastical incomes for four years, and ordered Itherius, as collector of the same, to assign one half of it to the papal camera and the other to the king, a doubt has arisen whether, in the aforesaid dioceses, the taxation is to be made according to the old or the new rate. The pope replies that, inasmuch as the benefices in those parts have not recovered from the devastation caused by the wars, the tenth is to be exacted for four years, according to the new taxation. This was dated 16 Kal. Oct. anno 17. Pope Benedict now orders Bernard to observe the directions of John XXII. in regard to the collection of any residue of the said four years’ tenth, but not to extend them to any other tenth now or to be imposed.
10 Kal. Aug.
Avignon.
(f. 81.)
To Peter, cardinal of St. Praxed's, and Bertrand, cardinal of St. Mary's in Aquiro. Congratulating them, and ordering them to persevere in their labours in fostering peace between the kings of France and England, to whom the pope is sending special letters, of which the tenour is enclosed.
Ibid. To Philip, king of the Franks. Urging him to put an end to the contest between him and the king of England, which causes the loss of souls, the destruction of bodies, devastation, and other horrors. The pope requests him to choose persons to treat with king Edward, and so arrange a peace.
Ibid.
(f. 81d.)
To the king of England. The like.
5 Id. Aug.
Avignon.
(f. 82.)
To cardinals Peter and Bertrand, papal nuncios. The pope has heard of their return to France, their appearance before king Philip, together with the envoys of king Edward, and their favourable reception. Furthermore, that at the petition of the said envoys, it pleased king Philip that before the treaty was begun certain others, companions of the envoys, who were with king Edward in Almain, and the cardinals, should go to Arras, where all those who had to treat were to meet. In the pope's letters, addressed to the two kings, the last clause, a copy of which was sent to the cardinals, was purposely omitted, as the pope, not as a superior, but as a party to the treaty, does not wish to revive the point contained in that clause which the king of France was unwilling to accept. The clause was left in the copy in order that, should opportunity be found, the cardinals could treat it as part of their instructions. The pope therefore orders them to labour sedulously for peace, and follow the negotiations, which they are to take into their hands only when other ways of bringing them to the desired issue are closed. If the parties voluntarily desire the nuncios’ intervention, and a reasonable plan, agreeable to either party, is chosen, then they are to take care that their labour is not in vain, and to use all diligence and vigilance in prosecuting it, informing the pope of what they do. The pope sends them a copy of his letter to the king of France, which they are to present.
Ibid.
(f. 83.)
To cardinal Bertrand, papal nuncio. Though the pope has written both to him and to his colleague, only cardinal Bertrand's letter has been received; so, in order that there may be no rivalry between them, they are to communicate to one another the letters of the pope, who commends cardinal Bertrand's diligence in writing.
4 Kal. Oct.
Avignon.
(f. 96d.)
To cardinals Peter and Bertrand, papal nuncios. The pope has received their letters, informing him that king Edward is about to send envoys to them touching the treaty of peace between him and king Philip. The pope orders the nuncios to join their endeavours to those of the envoys on either side, so that peace, or, at least, a truce, may be made.
Kal. Oct.
Avignon.
(f. 97.)
To Philip, king of France. Informing him that one who was present at the treaty and colloquy between King Edward and Lewis of Bavaria, says that it was intimated that although a large military subsidy was offered to the said king by the Teutons, and at once, if he wished it, nevertheless it was put off until next May, since from that part of Almain next to France the king would have at any time, and as often as he pleased, within eight days a force of 6000 troops, equipped at their own expense, and costing nothing to the king Edward until they become part of his army. Even if this be not true, it may be suspected that king Philip's enemies pretend these delays in order to put him off his guard, wherefore the pope begs him to be cautious.
Id. Nov.
Avignon.
(f. 120.)
To king Edward. The pope reminds him of the letters written to him, touching Lewis of Bavaria, who in opposition to John XXII. entered Italy, and publicly admitted to his company divers heretics, who under his protection published their heresies, which were approved by his letters and under his seal, thereby incurring sentences of excommunication and anathema, yet he did not shrink from coming to Rome, where he caused Peter de Corbaria to be placed as Roman pontiff, whereupon John XXII. denounced him as deprived of all dignity and honours, and issued sentences against him and his adherents, adding that on his repentance he would be readmitted into the bosom of the church. Benedict XII. in the hope of recovering the said Lewis, received his envoys, and dealt with them touching his reconciliation. The pope meanwhile requested king Edward to withdraw himself wholly from the said Lewis, but he is grieved to hear that the king will not listen to this request, having received from Lewis the title of Imperial Vicar, and as such having called on divers prelates and ecclesiastics to do homage to Lewis or to himself for the lands, goods, and rights, which they hold under the empire. The pope wonders that king Edward should go to Almain in pursuit of his rights with danger and expense to himself, and in contempt of the sentences issued by John XXII. The report that the pope had given a vast sum of money to king Philip and had granted him the institution of ecclesiastics is false. The tenth given by the pope to king Philip was not against king Edward, but against Lewis's Teuton adherents, who were preparing to invade France. The pope has laboured and is labouring to make peace between the two kings, and has sent to them cardinals as nuncios, and he calls on king Edward to free himself from the bonds and snares in which he is involved by his relations with Lewis, and exhorts him, inasmuch as Lewis is neither king nor emperor, to seek absolution from the penalties and sentences which he has incurred. To sin is human, to persevere in sins is diabolical, wherefore let the king direct his feet in the right and safe way, and without delay acquiesce in what is proposed by the cardinals touching the treaty of peace. It is unworthy of him to be the vicar of a temporal lord, and still less of one who has no authority. The pope is ready, if the king acquiesces, to give him a helping hand, but otherwise must proceed against him as justice demands. [Fœdera, ii. 1063.]
Id. Nov.
Avignon.
(f. 123.)
To John, archbishop of Canterbury. The pope wonders and is disturbed at king Edward's disregard of the sentences issued against Lewis of Bavaria and his adherents, and that he has accepted the office of vicar for Almain and Germany. The pope requires the archbishop to set before the king the dangers in which he is involved, in order that he may extricate himself from them before they gather strength and become offensive in the sight of God and man.
Ibid.
(f. 124.)
The like to the bishop of Durham.
Id. Nov.
Avignon.
(f. 124.)
To the bishop of Liége. Touching the action of king Edward as vicar of the empire in demanding homage from him and other prelates and ecclesiastics. The pope has endeavoured to withdraw the king from this course, and requests the bishop to oppose firmly all invasion or usurpation of the rights of the Roman church, or of his see. To this effect the pope is writing to the archbishops of Cologne and Besançon, and to the bishops in those parts.
1338.
Id. Nov.
Avignon.
(f. 124d.)
To cardinals Peter and Bertrand, papal nuncios. Sending them a copy of the pope's letter to king Edward, which they are to present to him, and of other letters patent, touching the inhibition laid by the pope on the prelates above named to pay homage to king Edward as vicar of the empire.
Ibid.
(f. 125.)
To the same. Mandate to inhibit the archbishops of Cologne and Besançon, and the bishops in those parts, from paying homage to king Edward as vicar of the empire, and to enforce the inhibition by spiritual and temporal penalties and sentences.
Ibid.
(f. 126.)
To the same. Sending them a copy of the letters of inhibition addressed to the above-named prelates in Almain and Germany, touching the homage demanded, and ordering them, before proceeding to compulsion, to warn and induce the said prelates to acquiesce in the pope's wishes.
15 Kal. Dec.
Avignon.
(f. 126d.)
To the same. Having in other letters expressed his will that they should not offer themselves as parties to treat for the peace between the kings of France and England, but should accept that office if offered to them, the pope now desires them to offer themselves, and to undertake whatever labours may be necessary for obtaining the peace which the pope so ardently desires.
9 Kal. Dec.
Avignon.
(f. 126d.)
To the same. The pope is disturbed on hearing that what he has written to them secretly touching their mission has been published. They are to take care that this does not occur again.
11 Kal. Dec.
Avignon.
(f. 126d.)
To the chapter of Liége. Requiring them to support their bishop in his resistance to the claim of homage made by king Edward as vicar of the empire.
Ibid.
(f. 127d.)
The like to William de Scabinis, and to the magistrates in the city of Liége and in the towns of the diocese.
8 Kal. Dec.
Avignon.
(f. 127d.)
To cardinals Peter and Bertrand, papal nuncios. Sending them copies of the above letters, which they are to transmit as shall be expedient.
3 Kal. Dec.
Avignon.
(f. 127d.)
To the same. The pope has received letters from king Edward, and sends a copy of them to the nuncios. As the king appears to be well affected to the pope, and to the Roman church, the nuncios are to desist from any exasperating process, and are not to deliver the letters above written to the prelates and others, unless, from the king's action, it may be necessary to take further proceedings against him.
9 Kal. Dec.
Avignon.
(f. 128.)
To Philip, king of France. The pope has heard from the Bardi, Perusii, and Ayazali, merchants of Florence, that some of the king's people have seized some of the merchants’ factors dwelling in France, and have taken their money and goods under pretext of a similar suspicion that they were in favour of the king of England. It is not likely that these merchants, whose business is increased by the peace between France and England, would do anything to promote war. The pope therefore begs king Philip to listen to their explanations; and commends them to him as devoted both to the pope and to him and to his realm.
11 Kal. Jan.
Avignon.
(f. 140.)
To cardinals Peter and Bertrand, papal nuncios. The pope has received their letters touching the peace between France and England, and desires them, in case their presence should be of no further service, to write to that effect, as their presence is much needed by the pope. Touching their letters in explanation of the breach of secrecy, the pope replies that he now holds them excused, and desires them to let no one see what he writes privately except the papal abbreviator and writer.
1339.
Kal. Jan.
Avignon.
(f. 140.)
To cardinal Peter. The pope thanks him for his answer, in conformity with the pope's intention, to what was demanded by the two kings against one another, that it would be inexpedient to both parties, and dishonourable to the pope; who desires him to omit nothing that may make for peace.
Ibid.
(f. 140d.)
To cardinals Peter and Bertrand, papal nuncios. It is no fault of theirs, but is to be ascribed to their diligence, that they delivered the pope's letters addressed to the king of England, and to certain prelates [touching the homage demanded] before the other letters, ordering them not to deliver the above letters, reached them. The pope desires them to continue their labours for peace, and to write to him what they have done.
1338.
6 Kal. Aug.
Avignon.
(f. 152.)
To Master Bernard de Sistre, archdeacon of Canterbury, papal nuncio. Acquittance for 600 florins collected by him in England, and paid by Master Michael Ricomanni, canon of Valence, to Bernard, bishop of Huesca, for the papal camera.
17 Kal. Jan.
Avignon.
(f. 152d.)
To the same. Acquittance for 600l. collected by him in England, and paid last August to Dinus Forceti, of the society of the Bardi, dwelling in London, and by him assigned to Lapus Nicoli, of the said society, on 21st November, in the sum of 3600 florins, at the rate of 40d. a florin, for the papal camera.
Ibid. Receipt for the same to the Bardi of Florence.

Footnotes

1 Regestrum litterarum tam patentium quam clausarum que transiverunt per cameram.


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1337