Regesta 134
1339

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. H. Bliss (editor)

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1895

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573-578

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'Regesta 134: 1339', Calendar of Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 2: 1305-1342 (1895), pp. 573-578. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=96143 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Regesta, Vol. CXXXIV.

5 Benedict XII. (fn. 1)

1339.
12 Kal. Feb.
Avignon.
(f. 13d.)
To Master Bernard de Sistre, archdeacon of Canterbury, papal nuncio. Acquittance for 400l. collected by him and paid over in August last to Galeatius Lapi of the society of the Alberti, dwelling in London, and by him assigned in the sum of 2400 florins, at the rate of 40d. a florin, to Clarissimus Falconerii of the said Society, for the papal camera.
10 Kal. Feb.
Avignon.
(f. 113.)
To Peter, cardinal of St. Praxed's, and Raymond, cardinal of St. Mary's in Aquiro, papal nuncios. The pope has received their letters, and he desires them to persist in their labours to promote the treaty of peace between the kings of France and England. If it is expedient that they should personally present themselves to king Philip, the pope wishes them to do whatever they think most useful, and to write to him of what they do and hear.
3 Non. Mar.
Avignon.
(f. 116.)
To the same. The pope commends them for what they have done in the interests of peace before they met king Philip at Pontoise, and for what they did there. Although the answer given to the pope by king Philip's councillors does not seem to tend to the desired result, the pope nevertheless greatly hopes that, even if his labours, and those of the nuncios are ineffectual, they will be found to have done their duty, and will be excused before God and man in continuing their endeavours until, which God forbid, they become wholly useless. As the nuncios have thought it would be of service if they went to Almain, the pope tells them that by deliberation with the cardinals it has been ordered that no cardinal should be sent to those parts at present, not only on account of the risks they would run, but also because those Teutons have rendered themselves unworthy of such a visit. The pope is awaiting the return of Master Arnald de Verdala, papal chaplain, lately sent to Lewis of Bavaria, whose answer, when brought, will be considered, and then the pope will send directions to the nuncios.
13 Kal. May.
Avignon.
(f. 117.)
To the same. The pope has received their letters, and at the same time came king Edward's envoy, the bishop of Durham, of whose coming the nuncios wrote. The pope desires the nuncios to favour the proposals made, which seem to him to be opportune, and to induce king Philip to accept it, and to make a truce.
3 Non. May.
Avignon.
(f. 117d.)
To the same. The pope has recently heard that king Edward intended to send envoys to them empowered to treat touching the peace between him and king Philip, from whom they had obtained letters of safe conduct for the envoys for fifteen days after Pentecost. Since, as is reported, the coming of the said envoys is uncertain, and as the presence of the nuncios is desired by the pope, he desires them, if at the end of the term of the safe conduct they can be of no further service in the said business, to return to him.
9 Kal. June.
Avignon.
(f. 117d.)
To the same. The pope has received their letters, and in reply to them he says that if, after the lapse of the above-named term within which king Edward's envoys were to arrive, the nuncios see that they can be of no further service in the business committed to them, they are to return to the pope.
Kal. May.
Avignon.
(f. 118.)
To Robert de Pomayo, knight, castellan of Beaucaire. The pope is disturbed as hearing that Robert de Litelburs, knight, sent to the pope by king Edward, was on his return with papal letters, in company with Robert Swinfen, clerk, and Giles de Brabantia, as they passed through the diocese of Valence, seized and despoiled of their horses, money, and the pope's letters, and carried off to the castle of Beaucaire and kept there. The pope orders Robert to set them free, and to avoid the sentences incurred by those who seize and detain persons coming to and going from the apostolic see.
6 Id. June.
Avignon.
(f. 120.)
To cardinals Peter and Bertrand, papal nuncios. The pope has received their letters, and he is pleased with their contents touching the expectation and prorogation [of the terms of the safe conduct]. He wishes them to remain not only for the fifteen days, but for as much longer as they shall consider expedient.
Ibid. To cardinal Bertrand. The pope commends what he has written, and wishes him to know for certain that the pope has heard nothing of any treaty other than that for which he and his colleague have laboured with approved fidelity and circumspection. The pope wishes him to write again whatever he can learn touching Robert.
2 Non. July.
Avignon.
(f. 120.)
To the aforesaid cardinals. The pope, on reading their letters, wishes that, if the safe conduct of which they write is granted, they should remain in those parts as long as their presence there can further the desired peace or truce.
17 Kal. Aug.
Avignon.
(f. 120d.)
To cardinal Peter. The pope has learned from his letters that king Edward, writing to him and his colleague touching the safe conduct demanded from king Philip for the envoys who were to come to them, had sent two of his clerks, one a professor of theology and the other of civil law, who, on the part of king Edward, proposed to them the five conditions following:—(1) That the losses incurred on either side during the truce should be made good on either side; (2) That the allies and friends of either party should, during the truce, pass freely over the lands and dominions of both kings; (3) That merchandise and other things should be in like manner freely transported; (4) That the king of France should meanwhile give no help to the Scots; (5) That he should restore whatever part of the duchy of Aquitaine he has occupied since the king of England crossed the sea. The pope approves wholly the first and third of these conditions; the second, with the rider that no armed men should enter the territories of the said kings; as to the fourth, the pope suggests that a truce should be made between the Scots and the king of England for so long as the truce is made between the two kings, or that the business of Scotland should as well as that of France and England be placed in the pope's hands. The fifth condition is the most important; the pope thinks that the cardinal and his colleague should give no answer to the aforesaid points, but act as mediators on the lines suggested by the pope in the above suggestions, and as they shall see expedient.
4 Non. Aug.
Avignon.
(f. 121.)
To king Philip. The pope has received his letters touching the marriage proposed between the son of king Edward and a daughter of the duke of Brabant. A dispensation would be necessary, the parties being nearly related; but neither the king nor the duke have asked for it, and if they had it would have been refused on the ground that those who are confederate with heretics and enemies of the apostolic see are unworthy to obtain favours from it. Further, that such a marriage would be to the injury of France, and, chiefly, that it does not appear to proceed from a good and right intention. The pope has already given a like answer to Peter, cardinal of SS. Nereus and Achilleus, who spoke to him about it on the king's part.
3 Id. Sept.
Avignon.
(f. 121d.)
To cardinal Bertrand. The pope is pleased with his diligence in writing, and having already written to him and to his colleague touching the same matter, makes at present no further reply.
12 Kal. Oct.
Avignon.
(f. 121d.)
To Philip, king of France. The pope has received his letters touching the safe conduct he has liberally granted to the envoys of king Edward, and the proposals for peace made by the cardinal nuncios and others. The pope, while commending his prudence, requests him to consider the miseries of war, and to dispose himself to agree to a truce.
11 Kal. Oct.
Avignon.
(f. 122.)
To cardinals Peter and Bertrand, papal nuncios. The pope has received their letters containing the answer made on the part of king Edward by his envoy, Master Richard de Vaughan, D.C.L., touching the treaty of peace, that he did not intend to consent to the truce, while the conditions appended were not granted, but that out of reverence for the apostolic see he was ready, extra-judicially, to inform the nuncios, not as arbitrators but as mediators, concerning his acts and rights, and the losses and injuries he had suffered by the king of France, and concerning the demands arising therefrom, of which, as he said, they had never fully heard; and that he begged them to remain in those parts to the end that, as he said, a truce or peace would be more easily arrived at when the said information had been laid before the pope and the cardinals; wherefore the said king would send to the nuncios envoys empowered to treat for peace and arrange a truce, provided that the envoys of the king of France were equally empowered. In the letters sent to the pope it was added that the king of France's envoys on hearing this answer considered that the treaty was broken off; and the nuncios in great perplexity, hearing that both kings were preparing for war, demanded counsel of the pope, who, while recognising the ability of the nuncios, is of opinion that they cannot leave those parts without being blamed, and giving cause for people to blame the pope; as they have hitherto laboured in safety, they cannot leave the ship until they have brought it into port. Were they to withdraw themselves, the common herd would open their mouths against them and the pope, who, placed as he is on a watch-tower, would have to send others to take their place; and he therefore tells them to place their hope in God, and refuse to entertain any proposal to leave those parts, continuing their mission with all possible solicitude and diligence. Although the pope has ordered them not to leave France, he now desires them, if they can do so without risk, to betake themselves to the king of England; and reminds them that if the two kings will not be persuaded, then they have faculty, after due consideration of circumstances, and if they think it not displeasing to king Philip, to publish a truce, and bring it to the notice of the said kings. The nuncios are to listen with favour to what may be urged by Master Richard on behalf of king Edward's rights, provided that there is nothing in it derogatory of the honour of king Philip, whom they will always find to be obedient and reasonable.
8 Id. Oct.
Avignon.
(f. 123d.)
To Philip, king of France. As the pope rejoiced on receiving his letters touching his readiness to make peace with king Edward, and to listen to the cardinal nuncios, and asked for a safe-conduct for king Edward's envoys, so now does the pope commend him. Inasmuch as the desired peace is necessary, not only for the two kings and their realms, but also for the whole of Christendom, the pope urges the king to promote it as fitting to the honour of his royal dignity. News has come that the Teutons, who take part with king Edward, who, under pretext of his being nominated vicar of the empire, is said to have acted against the church and county of Cambray, have begun new practices in the said county, thinking perhaps to provoke king Philip to attack them, and so give occasion to the princes and others of Almain to invade France. The pope, who has king Philip's interests at heart, thinks that in accordance with the example of Philip his predecessor, in like case, the king should await the threatened invasion, taking counsel, and making due preparation, and prays God that wars may cease and peace be maintained among Catholic princes and people.
4 Id. Oct.
Avignon.
(f. 124d.)
To king Edward that he may come to a better mind. The pope has already written to the king touching Lewis of Bavaria, whose support of the anti-pope Peter de Corbaria, has caused him, in accordance with the processes instituted by John XXII. to be deprived of all dignity and honour, and has called on king Edward to consider the penalties attached to the alliance with one condemned for heresy; notwithstanding which the king has been nominated vicar of the empire in Almain and Germany, and their provinces, thereby incurring the sentences issued against Lewis, who is neither king nor emperor. The pope required the king to retrace his steps, and hoped that he would return to the path of rectitude and truth; but it appears from the complaint of William, bishop of Cambray, that the king, under pretext of acting as vicar [of the empire], has collected horse and foot against the city of Cambray, and besieged it. The pope again requires and enjoins the king to consider his dangerous position, and to raise the siege, and to lay down his office of vicar. If he does not do this, the pope will proceed to publish the penalties and sentences decreed in the processes instituted by John XXII. and will take such further action as shall be expedient. [Fœdera, ii. 1092.]
4 Id. Oct.
Avignon.
(f. 126.)
To John, archbishop of Canterbury. The pope rehearses the contents of the above letter, and informs the archbishop that he will proceed against the king, who will be declared to have incurred the aforesaid penalties and sentences.
Ibid.
(f. 127d.)
The like to Richard, bishop of Durham.
Ibid. To cardinals Peter and Bertrand, papal nuncios. The pope rehearses the letter written to king Edward, and orders them to publish the penalties and sentences incurred by the king in regard to the siege of Cambray, and to inform him that if he does not come to a better mind, the pope will proceed to increase the said penalties and sentences.
Ibid.
(f. 129.)
To the same. The pope sends them a copy of the letters close which he has written to king Edward, and orders them to present the same; he sends also other letters which they are to use as shall be expedient.
5 Kal. Nov.
Avignon.
(f. 129.)
To the same. The pope has received their letters, and he is much pained that they have been unable to bring about a peace; but, while having recourse to divine help, he urges them to be ready to seize any opening that may present itself to obtain the concord so much desired.
14 Kal. Dec.
Avignon.
(f. 129d.)
To the same. As their presence is needed by the pope, they are, if their stay in France is of no use in regard to their mission, to return to him.
1339.
2 Id. Dec.
Avignon.
(f. 130.)
To Joan, queen of France and Navarre. The pope has received her letters, touching herself and her daughters, for whom the pope, although he is filled with anxiety on account of the war between France and England, will have a special regard. The pope exhorts her to pray for peace, and to do what she can with prudence to promote it. He thanks her for the present she has sent him of cheeses from Brie.
10 Kal. Jan.
Avignon.
(f. 130.)
To Philip, king of France. Exhorting and beseeching him to consider the dangers of war, and, if possible, to make peace or truce with king Edward, to which end the pope has sent cardinals Peter and Bertrand, whose counsels will, as he hopes, if the king listens to them, have the desired result, the pope himself being ready to act as intermediary.
Ibid.
(f. 131.)
To king Edward. The like. [Fœdera, ii. 1103.]
Ibid. To cardinals Peter and Bertrand, papal nuncios. The pope is writing to the above-named kings, to whom he desires them to present his letters, and to send him their replies.

Footnotes

1 Regestrum litterarum tam patentium quam clausarum, que transiverunt per cameram.


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1338